Commands using finger (6)

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diff the same file in two directories.
This is useful when you're diffing two files of the same name in radically different directory trees. For example: Set $ path1='/some/long/convoluted/path/to/all/of/your/source/from/a/long/dead/machine' then $ path2='/local/version/of/same/file' then run the command. Much easier on the eyes when you're looking back across your command history, especially if you're doing the same diff over and over again.

Top ten (or whatever) memory utilizing processes (with children aggregate)
This command loops over all of the processes in a system and creates an associative array in awk with the process name as the key and the sum of the RSS as the value. The associative array has the effect of summing a parent process and all of it's children. It then prints the top ten processes sorted by size.

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Listen Digitally Imported Radio from CLI (without premium!)
This commands does just two things: fakes user agent (the one was taken from recent Android app) and sends the (possibly) listener ID (it can be any - I put "1" here because it works like a charm - after the name of stream ?1 as you can see). Look for the list of stations here: http://pub7.di.fm Or here: https://goo.gl/pdhhpQ Best regards, sxiii :)

Append last argument to last command
Just like "!$", except it does it instantly. Then you can hit enter if you want.

Draw kernel module dependancy graph.
parse "lsmod" output to "dot" format and pass it to "display". Without perl!

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

cpu info

Install pip with Proxy
Installs pip packages defining a proxy

Use AWS CLI and JQ to get a list of instances sorted by launch time
Use the AWS CLI tools to generate a list instances, then pipe them to JQ to show only their launch time and instance id. Finally use sort to bring them out in runtime order. Find all those instances you launched months ago and have forgotten about.


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