Commands using ftp (7)

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Download YouTube Videos using wget and youtube-dl and just using the video link
in place of "output-filename.mp4" put the name you want the file to be named with. in place of "youtube-video-link" put the link of the Video page eg: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AclA-7YntvE in place of "format-number" put the number of the file format you would like How to get the "format-number" to get format number type in below command before running this command $ youtube-dl -F "youtube-video-link" and it will list all the available formats with the format number, like to download in 360p mp4 use the number "18" To automatically let it fetch the best quality available just remove the -f "format-number" and you are good to go.

Install the Debian-packaged version of a Perl module
Running 'cpan Module::Name' will install that module from CPAN. This is a simple way of using a similar command to install a packaged Perl module from a Debian archive using apt-get.

Recursively remove all subversion folders

Get a list of ssh servers on the local subnet
Scan the local network for servers who have the ssh port open.

Turning off display
To turn off monitor: xset dpms force off To turn on, simply press a key, or move mouse/mousepad.

Print a list of installed Perl modules
Works only if modules are installed "the right way"

Find Duplicate Files (based on MD5 hash) -- For Mac OS X
This works on Mac OS X using the `md5` command instead of `md5sum`, which works similarly, but has a different output format. Note that this only prints the name of the duplicates, not the original file. This is handy because you can add `| xargs rm` to the end of the command to delete all the duplicates while leaving the original.

Find the package that installed a command

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

Look up the definition of a word
A bash function might also be useful: $ dict() { curl dict://dict.org/d:$1; } Or if you want less verbose output: $ dict() { curl -s dict://dict.org/d:$1 | perl -ne 's/\r//; last if /^\.$/; print if /^151/../^250/'; }


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