Commands using grep (1,891)

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Generate a binary file with all ones (0xff) in it
This is similar to how you would generate a file with all zeros $ dd if=/dev/zero of=allzeros bs=1024 count=2k

Show git branches by date - useful for showing active branches
This fixes a bug found in the other scripts which fail when a branch has the same name as a file or directory in the current directory.

Create an easy to pronounce shortened URL from CLI
Just add this function to your .zshrc / .bashrc, and by typing "shout *URL*" you get a randomly chosen English word that ShoutKey.com uses to short your URL. You may now go to shoutkey.com/*output_word* and get redirected. The URL will be valid for 5 minutes. (I've never used sed before, so I'll be quite glad if someone could straighten up the sed commands and combine them (perhaps also removing the whitespace). If so, I'll update it right away ;) )

Colorized grep in less
Get your colorized grep output in less(1). This involves two things: forcing grep to output colors even though it's not going to a terminal and telling less to handle those properly.

Find passwords that has been stored as plain text in NetworkManager

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

List all Windows services on the command line
On Windows 2000 or later, this command will give a listing of all the registered Windows services. You can then know what the name of a command is in order to start and stop it. e.g. $ sc start Apache2.2 or $ net start Apache2.2 Please note that sc will allow the SERVICE_NAME only, while net will allow both SERVICE_NAME and DISPLAY_NAME. Note that the space between the = and the next word are important. Not very unixy, that. http://www.ss64.com/nt/sc.html http://www.ss64.com/nt/net_service.html http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb490995.aspx

find and delete empty dirs, start in current working dir

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

watch your network load on specific network interface
-n means refresh frequency you could change eth0 to any interface you want, like wlan0


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