Commands using gs (23)

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list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Remote control for Rhythmbox on an Ubuntu Media PC
Note: you'll want to set up pub-key ssh auth. Gives you a quick means of changing volume/tracks/etc for rhythmbox on a remote machine. E.g.: rc --next # Play next track rc --print-playing # Grab the name rc --volume-down rc --help

List all execs in $PATH, usefull for grepping the resulting list
##Dependancies: bash coreutils Many executables in $PATH have the keyword somewhere other than the beginning in their file names. The command is useful for exploring the executables in $PATH like this. $ find ${PATH//:/ } -executable -type f -printf "%f\n" |grep admin lpadmin time-admin network-admin svnadmin users-admin django-admin shares-admin services-admin

shell equivalent of a boss button
Nobody wants the boss to notice when you're slacking off. This will fill your shell with random data, parts of it highlighted. Note that 'highlight' is the Perl module App::highlight, not "a universal sourcecode to formatted text converter." You'll also need Term::ANSIColor.

Convert wmv into avi

Identify differences between directories (possibly on different servers)
This can be much faster than downloading one or both trees to a common servers and comparing the files there. After, only those files could be copied down for deeper comparison if needed.

Check difference between two file directories recursively

calulate established tcp connection of local machine

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }


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