Commands using ifconfig (103)

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

Run a command only when load average is below a certain threshold
Good for one off jobs that you want to run at a quiet time. The default threshold is a load average of 0.8 but this can be set using atrun.

Schedule a script or command in x num hours, silently run in the background even if logged out
This is helpful for shell scripts, I use it in my custom php install script to schedule to delete the build files in 3 hours, as the php install script is completely automated and is made to run slow. Does require at, which some environments without crontab still do have. You can add as many commands to the at you want. Here's how I delete them in case the script gets killed. (trapped) atq |awk '{print $1}'|xargs -iJ atrm J &>/dev/null

Title Case Files
All words of the filenames except "a", "of", "that" and "to" are capitalized. To also match words which begin with a specific string, you can use this: $ rename 's/\b((?!hello\b|t)[a-z]+)/\u$1/g' * This will capitalize all words except "hello" and words beginning with "t".

MP3 player
I tried a few curses based mp3 players for playing back choir practice songs for my wife. Unfortunately none of the ones I tried were capable of scrubbing a track. Firefox saves the day.

Watch the progress of 'dd'
Only slightly different than previous commands. The benefit is that your "watch" should die when the dd command has completed. (Of course this would depend on /proc being available)

String to binary
Cool but useless.

Convert diff output to HTML ins/del

oneliner to transfer a directory using ssh and tar
this will tar/send/untrar a whole directory.

Simplest way to get size (in bytes) of a file

converting horizontal line to vertical line


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: