Commands using ifconfig (103)

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Show current pathname in title of terminal
This helps to keep track of what is going on when you have several tabs open in your terminal. The title automatically changes when you change directories.

echo unicode characters

Use a decoy while scanning ports to avoid getting caught by the sys admin :9
Scan for open ports on the target device/computer (192.168.0.10) while setting up a decoy address (192.168.0.2). This will show the decoy ip address instead of your ip in targets security logs. Decoy address needs to be alive. Check the targets security log at /var/log/secure to make sure it worked.

List processes sorted by CPU usage

Test a serial connection
If the connection works you should see a "hello" on host A. If not: check your cabeling etc :-)

a function to find the fastest DNS server
http://public-dns.info gives a list of online dns servers. you need to change the country in url (br in this url) with your country code. this command need some time to ping all IP in list.

Quick directory bookmarks
Set a bookmark as normal shell variable $ p=/cumbersome/path/to/project To go there $ to p This saves one "$" and is faster to type ;-) The variable is still useful as such: $ vim $p/ will expand the variable (at least in bash) and show a list of files to edit. If setting the bookmarks is too much typing you could add another function $ bm() { eval $1=$(pwd); } then bookmark the current directory with $ bm p

Find the package that installed a command

Edit 2 or more files in vim using vim -d
Use vim's diff mode to edit two or more files in one window. The '+diffoff!' turns off diff highlighting when the session is started. Use ctrl+w + ctrl+w to switch between windows.

Show the command line for a PID, converting nulls to spaces and a newline


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