Commands using ifconfig (103)

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

redirect stdout and stderr each to separate files and print both to the screen

Create a mirror of a local folder, on a remote server
Create a exact mirror of the local folder "/root/files", on remote server 'remote_server' using SSH command (listening on port 22) (all files & folders on destination server/folder will be deleted)

mailx to send mails from console
It is the best way i found to send a mail from the console in my centos server.

Stop or Start (Restart) a Windows service from a Linux machine
Control (stop, start, restart) a Windows Service from a Linux machine which has the `net` command (provided by samba).

Download from Rapidshare Premium using wget - Part 2
The download content part. NOTE: the '-c' seems to not work very well and the download stuck at 99% sometimes. Just finish wget with no problem. Also, the download may restart after complete. You can also cancel. I don't know if it is a wget or Rapidshare glitch since I don't have problems with Megaupload, for example. UPDATE: as pointed by roebek the restart glitch can be solved by the "-t 1" option. Thanks a lot.

Backticks are evil
This is a simple example of using proper command nesting using $() over ``. There are a number of advantages of $() over backticks. First, they can be easily nested without escapes: $ program1 $(program2 $(program3 $(program4))) versus $ program1 `program2 \`program3 \`program4\`\`` Second, they're easier to read, then trying to decipher the difference between the backtick and the singlequote: `'. The only drawback $() suffers from is lack of total portability. If your script must be portable to the archaic Bourne shell, or old versions of the C-shell or Korn shell, then backticks are appropriate, otherwise, we should all get into the habit of $(). Your future script maintainers will thank you for producing cleaner code.

Find the package that installed a command

Find out my Linux distribution name and version

Short and elegant way to backup a single file before you change it.
Remember to backup everything before changing it so you can restore all to normal.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: