Commands using init (5)

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See most used commands
It will return a ranked list of your most commonly-entered commands using your command history

Rapidly invoke an editor to write a long, complex, or tricky command
Next time you are using your shell, try typing ctrl-x e (that is holding control key press x and then e). The shell will take what you've written on the command line thus far and paste it into the editor specified by $EDITOR. Then you can edit at leisure using all the powerful macros and commands of vi, emacs, nano, or whatever.

Find usb device
I often use it to find recently added ou removed device, or using find in /dev, or anything similar. Just run the command, plug the device, and wait to see him and only him

makes screen your default shell without breaking SCP or SFTP
I changed my shell to screen by editing .bashrc, this stopped scp from connecting. Adding two tests before screen fixed them problem.

Make sudo forget password instantly
By default sudo 'remembers' password for a few minutes, so that you do not need to re-enter password for a series of sudo commands that might follow within a short time duration. However, sometime you might want sudo to instantly 'forget' the password. (Next sudo command will need you to reenter the password) Credit: I first learned this while listening to one of the 'tuxradar' podcast.

Makes you look busy
This makes an alias for a command named 'busy'. The 'busy' command opens a random file in /usr/include to a random line with vim. Drop this in your .bash_aliases and make sure that file is initialized in your .bashrc.

display ip address
add this alias in .bashrc to fast check the ip address of your modem router alias myip="curl -s http://myip.dk | grep '' | sed -e 's/]*>//g'"

ShadyURL via CLI

Display laptop battery information

list files recursively by size


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