Commands using jobs (4)

  • make, find and a lot of other programs can take a lot of time. And can do not. Supppose you write a long, complicated command and wonder if it will be done in 3 seconds or 20 minutes. Just add "R" (without quotes) suffix to it and you can do other things: zsh will inform you when you can see the results. You can replace zenity with other X Window dialogs program.


    1
    alias -g R=' &; jobs | tail -1 | read A0 A1 A2 cmd; echo "running $cmd"; fg "$cmd"; zenity --info --text "$cmd done"; unset A0 A1 A2 cmd'
    pipeliner · 2010-12-13 17:44:36 0
  • List background jobs, grep their number - not process id - and then kill them Show Sample Output


    0
    jobs | grep -o "[0-9]" | while read j; do kill %$j; done
    haggen · 2012-04-12 17:29:58 0
  • Execute commands serially on a list of hosts. Each ssh connection is made in the background so that if, after five seconds, it hasn't closed, it will be killed and the script will go on to the next system. Maybe there's an easier way to set a timeout in the ssh options...


    0
    for host in $MYHOSTS; do ping -q -c3 $H 2>&1 1>/dev/null && ssh -o 'AllowedAuthe ntications publickey' $host 'command1; command2' & for count in 1 2 3 4 5; do sleep 1; jobs | wc -l | grep -q ^0\$ && continue; done; kill %1; done
    a8ksh4 · 2012-11-13 23:12:27 0
  • Cleaned up and silent with &>/dev/null at the end. Show Sample Output


    0
    for host in $HOSTNAMES; do ping -q -c3 $host && ssh $host 'command' & for count in {1..15}; do sleep 1; jobs | wc -l | grep -q ^0\$ && continue; done; kill %1; done &>/dev/null
    somaddict · 2012-11-16 02:31:27 0

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