Commands using join (9)

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Uniquely (sort of) color text so you can see changes
Colorify colors input by converting the text to a number and then performing modulo 7 on it. This resulting number is used as the color escape code. This can be used to color the results of commands with complex outputs (like "482279054165371") so if any of the digits change, there's a good chance the color will change too. I say good chance because there's only 7 unique colors here, so assuming you were watching random numbers, there would be a 6/7 chance that the color would change when the number changed. This should really only be used to help quickly identify when things change, but should not be the only thing relied upon to positively assert that an output has not changed.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Find files that have been modified on your system in the past 60 minutes
Useful mainly for debugging or troubleshooting an application or system, such as X11, Apache, Bind, DHCP and others. Another useful switch that can be combined with -mmin, -mtime and so forth is -daystart. For example, to find files that were modified in the /etc directory only yesterday: $ sudo find /etc -daystart -mtime 1 -type f

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Testing php configuration

Simple XML tag extract with sed
Limited, but useful construct to extract text embedded in XML tags. This will only work if bar is all on one line. If nobody posts an alternative for the multiline sed version, I'll figure it out later...

Convert encoding of given files from one encoding to another

All what exists in dir B and not in dir A will be copied from dir B to new or existing dir C
Assumed dir A, B, C are subdirs of the current dir Exact syntax of the command is: rsync -v -r --size-only --compare-dest=/path_to_A/A/ /path_to_B/B/ /path_to_C/C/ (do not omit end-slashes, since that would copy only the names and not the contents of subdirs of dir B to dir C) You can replace --size-only with --checksum for more thorough file differences validation Useful switch: -n, --dry-run perform a trial run with no changes made

Backup with versioning
Apart from an exact copy of your recent contents, also keep all earlier versions of files and folders that were modified or deleted. Inspired by the excellent EVACopy http://evacopy.sourceforge.net

High resolution video screen recording
$ gorecord foo.mp4 I've tried all of the screen recorders available for Linux and this is easily the best. xvidcap segfaults; VNC is too much hassle. There are alternatives of this command already here that I am just too lazy to reply to. Messing with the frames per second option, -r, 25 seems to be the best. Any lower and the video will look like a flipbook, if it records at all - -r 10 won't - any faster is the same, oddly enough. Edit: CLF doesn't like my long command to add audio, so here it is in the description. $ goaddaudio() ${ $if [ $# != 3 ]; then $ echo 'goaddaudio < audio > < src video > < dst video >' $ return $ fi $ $ f=goaddaudio$RANDOM $ ffmpeg -i "$2" &> $f $ d=$( grep Duration $f | awk '{print $2}' | tr -d ',' ) && $ rm $f && $ ffmpeg -i "$1" -i "$2" -r 25 -ab 192k -ar 44100 -sameq -t $d "$3" $}


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