Commands using lockfile (1)

  • Programs for locking and unlocking files and mailboxes.This package includes several programs to safely lock and unlock files and mailboxes from the command line. These include: lockfile-create lockfile-remove lockfile-touchlock mail-lock mail-unlock mail-touchlock These programs use liblockfile to perform the file locking and unlocking, so they are guaranteed compatible with Debian's file locking policies.


    4
    lockfile
    tiagofischer · 2009-11-23 12:07:07 0

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