Commands using lsattr (1)

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Wrap text files on the command-line for easy reading
fold wraps text at 80 characters wide, and with the -s flag, only causes wrapping to occur between words rather than through them.

Watch active calls on an Asterisk PBX
Show active calls as the happen on an Asterisk server. Note that the Asterisk command (in single quotes) is formatted for Asterisk 1.6. Use the -n flag on the watch command to modify the refresh period (in seconds - default is 2 seconds).

Recursive grep of all c++ source under the current directory
I like this better than some of the alternatives using -exec, because if I want to change the string, it's right there at the end of the command line. That means less editing effort and more time to drink coffee.

Count lines of code across multiple file types, sorted by least amount of code to greatest
The same as the other two alternatives, but now less forking! Instead of using '\;' to mark the end of an -exec command in GNU find, you can simply use '+' and it'll run the command only once with all the files as arguments. This has two benefits over the xargs version: it's easier to read and spaces in the filesnames work automatically (no -print0). [Oh, and there's one less fork, if you care about such things. But, then again, one is equal to zero for sufficiently large values of zero.]

Search recursively to find a word or phrase in certain file types, such as C code
I have a bash alias for this command line and find it useful for searching C code for error messages. The -H tells grep to print the filename. you can omit the -i to match the case exactly or keep the -i for case-insensitive matching. This find command find all .c and .h files

Use a decoy while scanning ports to avoid getting caught by the sys admin :9
Scan for open ports on the target device/computer (192.168.0.10) while setting up a decoy address (192.168.0.2). This will show the decoy ip address instead of your ip in targets security logs. Decoy address needs to be alive. Check the targets security log at /var/log/secure to make sure it worked.

Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials

Commandline document conversion with Libreoffice
In this example, the docx gets converted to Open Document .odt format. For other formats, you'll need to specify the correct filter (Hint: see "Comments" link below for a nice list).

Backup your LDAP
Simple way to backup your LDAP entries: put this line on your crontab. The -n switch identifies the dbnum you want to backup (alternatively you can use -b suffix. Check man slapcat for your personal switches)

pop-up messages on a remote computer
Run this command when you are physically at the computer you wish to send pop-up messages to. Then when you ssh in to it, you can do this: echo "guess who?" > commander guess who? will then pop up on the screen for a few moments, then disappear. You will need to create the commander file first. I mess with my wife all the time with this. i.e. echo "You have given the computer a virus. Computer will be rendered useless in 10 seconds." > commander lol


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