Commands using lsmod (7)

  • parse `lsmod' output and pass to `dot' drawing utility then finally pass it to an image viewer


    35
    lsmod | perl -e 'print "digraph \"lsmod\" {";<>;while(<>){@_=split/\s+/; print "\"$_[0]\" -> \"$_\"\n" for split/,/,$_[3]}print "}"' | dot -Tpng | display -
    bandie91 · 2011-11-27 14:02:35 12
  • parse "lsmod" output to "dot" format and pass it to "display". Without perl!


    15
    lsmod | awk 'BEGIN{print "digraph{"}{split($4, a, ","); for (i in a) print $1, "->", a[i]}END{print "}"}'|display
    point_to_null · 2011-12-04 01:41:23 2
  • Run this as root, it will be helpful to quickly get information about the loaded kernel modules. Show Sample Output


    2
    lsmod | cut -d' ' -f1 | xargs modinfo | egrep '^file|^desc|^dep' | sed -e'/^dep/s/$/\n/g'
    mohan43u · 2009-11-17 02:13:34 0
  • Liked command 4077 so I improved it, by doing all text manipulation with sed. "Run this as root, it will be helpful to quickly get information about the loaded kernel modules." THX mohan43u Show Sample Output


    1
    lsmod | sed -e '1d' -e 's/\(\([^ ]*\) \)\{1\}.*/\2/' | xargs modinfo | sed -e '/^dep/s/$/\n/g' -e '/^file/b' -e '/^desc/b' -e '/^dep/b' -e d
    marssi · 2009-11-17 22:51:08 0
  • Returns the version of the kernel module specified as "MODULENAME", when available. Show Sample Output


    1
    lsmod | grep -io MODULENAME| xargs modinfo | grep -iw version
    adriano · 2013-03-18 07:52:14 10

  • 0
    lsmod | tail -n +2 | cut -d' ' -f1 | xargs modinfo | egrep '^file|^desc|^dep' | sed -e'/^dep/s/$/\n/g'
    vlaad · 2012-09-03 17:59:49 0
  • Info about Bluetooth devices. Show Sample Output


    0
    hciconfig;hciconfig -a hci0;lsmod |grep bt;dmesg | grep tooth
    FadeMind · 2013-08-21 12:29:23 0

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