Commands using mail (33)

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Losslessly rotate videos from your phone by 90 degrees.
Takes all the .3gp files in the directory, rotates them by 90 degrees, and saves them in the lossless ffv1 encoding. If this rotates in the wrong direction, you may want transponse=1 Re-encoding to ffv1 may result in a significant increase in file size, as it is a lossless format. Other applications may not recognize ffv1 if they don't use ffmpeg code. "huffyuv" might be another option for lossless saving of your transformations. The audio may be re-encoded as well, if the encoding used by your 3gp file doesn't work in a avi container.

files and directories in the last 1 hour
added alias in ~/.bashrc alias lf='find ./* -ctime -1 | xargs ls -ltr --color'

Email yourself a short note
I created this so I could send myself an email alert when a long-running job was finished, e.g., $ my_long_job.exe ; quickemail my_long_job.exe has finished

Show numerical values for each of the 256 colors in bash
Same as http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/5876, but for bash. This will show a numerical value for each of the 256 colors in bash. Everything in the command is a bash builtin, so it should run on any platform where bash is installed. Prints one color per line. If someone is interested in formatting the output, paste the alternative.

Rename files in batch

"I Feel Lucky" for Google Images
prompts for a search term and then pulls down the first result from google images

Perpetual calendar
Gets any date since today. Other examples of recognized expressions are "2 years 4 days ago", "7 months" (in the future), "next Sunday", "yesterday", "tomorrow", etc.

Direct auto-complete in bash
Direct auto-complete in bash

Rename many files in directories and subdirectories
This is probably overkill, but I have some issues when the directories have spaces in their names. The $ find . -type d -print0 | while read -d $'\0' dir; do xxx; done loops over all the subdirectories in this place, ignoring the white spaces (to some extend). $ cd "$dir"; echo " process $dir"; cd -; goes to the directory and back. It also prints some info to check the progress. $ find . -maxdepth 1 -name "*.ogg.mp3" -exec rename 's/.ogg.mp3/.mp3/' {} \; renames the file within the current directory. The whole should work with directories and file names that include white spaces.

remove all spaces from all files in current folder


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