Commands using man (67)

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Mount a temporary ram partition
Makes a partition in ram which is useful if you need a temporary working space as read/write access is fast. Be aware that anything saved in this partition will be gone after your computer is turned off.

Step#2 Create a copy of the bootload and partition table!
Step#2 Create a copy of the bootload and partition table!

Git diff last two commits
How about this one ?

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

seq (argc=2) for FreeBSD

List your MACs address
List all MAC addresses on a Linux box. sort -u is useful when having virtual interfaces.

Find the package that installed a command

Loop over the days of a month, in $YYYY$MM$DD format
Edit YYYY and MM at the beginning of the command with the year and month you want. Note that `DD=$(printf "%02d" $d)` will pad single digit integers with a leading zero. Substitute `echo $YYYY$MM$DD` at the end of the line with the command you want to launch, for instance script.pl --yyyymmdd $YYYY$MM$DD Also available on GitHub as bash util: https://github.com/fibo/yyyymmdd

Identify differences between directories (possibly on different servers)
This can be much faster than downloading one or both trees to a common servers and comparing the files there. After, only those files could be copied down for deeper comparison if needed.


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: