Commands using mkisofs (2)

  • Create ISO image of a folder in Linux. You can assign label to ISO image and mount correctly with -allow-lowercase option.


    14
    mkisofs -J -allow-lowercase -R -V "OpenCD8806" -iso-level 4 -o OpenCD.iso ~/OpenCD
    alamati · 2010-02-02 05:24:18 1
  • create iso image from directory . Usefull for virtualised machine To create CD ISO image of directories that contain long file name or non-8.3 format (particularly if you want to burn the CD image for use in Windows system), use the -J option switch that generates Joliet directory records in addition to regular iso9660 file names. For example, to create CD image of Vista SP1 directory: mkisofs -o VitaSP1.iso -J VistaSP1 Show Sample Output


    7
    mkisofs -o XYZ.iso XYZ/
    eastwind · 2009-10-17 16:28:47 1

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