Commands using mknod (4)

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Remove color codes (special characters) with sed

Find
A lot of X applications accept --geometry parameter so that you can set application size and position. But how can you figure out the exact arguments for --geometry? Launch an application, resize and reposition its window as needed, then launch xwininfo in a terminal an click on the application window. You will see some useful window info including its geometry.

Check SATA link speed.
Check SATA controller type. 6.0 Gbps - SATA III 3.0 Gbps - SATA II 1.5 Gbps - SATA I

Compare a remote dir with a local dir
You can compare directories on two different remote hosts as well: $ diff -y

grep for minus (-) sign
Use flag "--" to stop switch parsing

Paged, colored svn diff
I put this in a shell script called "svndiff", as it provides a handy decorated "svn diff" output that is colored (which you can't see here) and paged. The -r is required so less doesn't mangle the color codes.

Stripping ^M at end of each line for files

Search for a process by name
ps and grep is a dangerous combination -- grep tries to match everything on each line (thus the all too common: grep -v grep hack). ps -C doesn't use grep, it uses the process table for an exact match. Thus, you'll get an accurate list with: ps -fC sh rather finding every process with sh somewhere on the line.

Resize A Mounted EXT3 File System
Live extension of an ext3 file system on logical volume $v by 200GB without the need to unmount/remount. Requires that you have 1) a version of resize2fs that contains code merged from ext2online, and 2) kernel support for online resizing. (e.g. RHEL 5)

Check whether laptop is running on battery or cable
In my case it was actually like this...


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