Commands using modinfo (6)

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Use /dev/full to test language I/O-failsafety
The Linux /dev/full file simulates a "disk full" condition, and can be used to verify how a program handles this situation. In particular, several programming language implementations do not print error diagnostics (nor exit with error status) when I/O errors like this occur, unless the programmer has taken additional steps. That is, simple code in these languages does not fail safely. In addition to Perl, C, C++, Tcl, and Lua (for some functions) also appear not to fail safely.

Bring the word under the cursor on the :ex line in Vim
Very handy to bring the word currently under the cursor into a :s command in Vim. Example: If the cursor was on the word "eggs": :s/ ==> :s/eggs

Go to the previous sibling directory in alphabetical order
Based on linkinpark342 suggestion. Sometimes you have to browse your way through a lot of sub-directories. This command cd to the previous sub-directory in alphabetical order. For example, if you have the directories "lectures/01-intro", "lectures/02-basic", "lectures/03-advanced" and so on, and your PWD is "02-basic", it jumps to "01-intro".

Indent a one-liner.
Bash builtin type also indents the function.

bash: hotkey to put current commandline to text-editor
* in bash-shell You can capture the current commandline to a text-editor: * simply press: CTRL+x+e * Your current commandline will pe put into Your default text-editor (export EDITOR=vim)

Easily decode unix-time (funtion)

To find the LDAP clients connected to LDAP service running on Solaris

Get simple weather info from a zip code
$ weather 97405

Are the two lines anagrams?
This is just a slight alternative that wraps all of #7917 in a function that can be executed

Display which distro is installed
Works on nearly all linux distros


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