Commands using mv (211)


  • 4
    for i in *.pdf; do mv "$i" CS749__"$i"; done
    ialmaescura · 2018-06-18 18:57:26 0
  • Creates one letter folders in the current directory and moves files with corresponding initial in the folder.


    4
    for i in *; do I=`echo $i|cut -c 1|tr a-z A-Z`; if [ ! -d "$I" ]; then mkdir "$I"; fi; mv "$i" "$I"/"$i"; done
    z3bu · 2018-06-29 11:37:04 1
  • Using bash parameters expansion


    4
    for file in *.txt; do mv "${file%.txt}{.txt,.xml}"; done
    rgawenda · 2020-01-23 08:54:34 0
  • Useful if non-ascii characters in filenames have been improperly encoded. Replace "PROBLEM" with the incorrect characters (e.g. 'é'), and "FIX" with the correct ones (e.g. '?').


    3
    for i in *;do mv "$i" "$(echo $i | sed s/PROBLEM/FIX/g)";done
    AlecSchueler · 2009-06-28 01:50:25 4

  • 3
    for x in *.ex1; do mv "${x}" "${x%ex1}ex2"; done
    Tuirgin · 2009-08-12 17:45:08 2
  • Checks if a web page has changed. Put it into cron to check periodically. Change http://www.page.de/test.html and [email protected] for your needs.


    3
    HTMLTEXT=$( curl -s http://www.page.de/test.html > /tmp/new.html ; diff /tmp/new.html /tmp/old.html ); if [ "x$HTMLTEXT" != x ] ; then echo $HTMLTEXT | mail -s "Page has changed." [email protected] ; fi ; mv /tmp/new.html /tmp/old.html
    Emzy · 2010-07-04 21:45:37 1
  • In general, this is actually not better than the "scrot -d4" command I'm listing it as an alternative to, so please don't vote it down for that. I'm adding this command because xwd (X window dumper) comes with X11, so it is already installed on your machine, whereas scrot probably is not. I've found xwd handy on boxen that I don't want to (or am not allowed to) install packages on. NOTE: The dd junk for renaming the file is completely optional. I just did that for fun and because it's interesting that xwd embeds the window title in its metadata. I probably should have just parsed the output from file(1) instead of cutting it out with dd(1), but this was more fun and less error prone. NOTE2: Many programs don't know what to do with an xwd format image file. You can convert it to something normal using NetPBM's xwdtopnm(1) or ImageMagick's convert(1). For example, this would work: "xwd | convert fd:0 foo.jpg". Of course, if you have ImageMagick already installed, you'd probably use import(1) instead of xwd. NOTE3: Xwd files can be viewed using the X Window UnDumper: "xwud <foo.xwd". ImageMagick and The GIMP can also read .xwd files. Strangely, eog(1) cannot. NOTE4: The sleep is not strictly necessary, I put it in there so that one has time to raise the window above any others before clicking on it. Show Sample Output


    3
    sleep 4; xwd >foo.xwd; mv foo.xwd "$(dd skip=100 if=foo.xwd bs=1 count=256 2>/dev/null | egrep -ao '^[[:print:]]+' | tr / :).xwd"
    hackerb9 · 2010-09-19 08:03:02 0
  • Same thing using bash built-in features instead of a sub-shell.


    3
    for f in *.txt;do mv ${f%txt}{txt,md}; done
    mobilediesel · 2010-12-09 18:55:15 0

  • 3
    mv file.png $( mktemp -u | cut -d'.' -f2 ).png
    rubenmoran · 2011-06-22 06:57:54 0

  • 3
    find . -iname *.java -type f -exec bash -c "iconv -f WINDOWS-1252 -t UTF-8 {} > {}.tmp " \; -exec mv {}.tmp {} \;
    miguelbaldi · 2012-01-12 20:00:26 0
  • An entirely shell-based solution (should work on any bourne-style shell), more portable on relying on the rename command, the exact nature of which varies from distro to distro.


    3
    for f in ./*.xls; do mv "$f" "${f%.*}.ods"; done
    evilsoup · 2013-09-17 01:41:56 0
  • imagemagick is required Show Sample Output


    3
    for i in `ls` ; do date=$(identify -format %[exif:DateTime] $i); date=${date//:/-}; date=${date// /_}; mv $i ${date}__$i; done
    klausman · 2014-10-30 20:35:16 1
  • Note that the -i will not help in a script. Proper error checking is required. Show Sample Output


    3
    mv -iv $FILENAME{,.$(stat -c %y $FILENAME | awk '{print $1}')}
    pdxdoughnut · 2014-12-01 22:41:38 2
  • Just use '-' to use STDIN as an additional input to 'cat'


    3
    echo "New first line" | cat - file.txt > newfile.txt; mv newfile.txt file.txt
    gpenguin · 2018-10-18 18:54:24 0
  • Change the file extension in batch. Useful to create output file names with same input name but distinct extension by including logic inside the loop


    3
    for file in *.txt; do mv "$file" "${file%.txt}.xml"; done
    neomefistox · 2019-10-24 04:35:10 0

  • 2
    ls -1 | while read a; do mv "$a" `echo $a | sed -e 's/\ /\./g'`; done
    nablas · 2009-02-27 13:34:12 4
  • A common mistake in Bash is to write command-line where there's command a reading a file and whose result is redirected to that file. It can be easily avoided because of : 1) warnings "-bash: file.txt: cannot overwrite existing file" 2) options (often "-i") that let the command directly modify the file but I like to have that small function that does the trick by waiting for the first command to end before trying to write into the file. Lots of things could probably done in a better way, if you know one... Show Sample Output


    2
    buffer () { tty -s && return; tmp=$(mktemp); cat > "${tmp}"; if [ -n "$1" ] && ( ( [ -f "$1" ] && [ -w "$1" ] ) || ( ! [ -a "$1" ] && [ -w "$(dirname "$1")" ] ) ); then mv -f "${tmp}" "$1"; else echo "Can't write in \"$1\""; rm -f "${tmp}"; fi }
    Josay · 2009-07-27 20:21:15 3
  • This command changes all filename and directories within a directory tree to unaccented ones. I had to do this to 'sanitize' some samba-exported trees. The reason it works might seem a little difficult to see at first - it first reverses-sort by pathname length, then it renames only the basename of the path. This way it'll always go in the right order to rename everything. Some notes: 1. You'll have to have the 'unaccent' command. On Ubuntu, just aptitude install unaccent. 2. In this case, the encoding of the tree was UTF-8 - but you might be using another one, just adjust the command to your encoding. 3. The program might spit a few harmless errors saying the files are the same - not to fear.


    2
    find /dir | awk '{print length, $0}' | sort -nr | sed 's/^[[:digit:]]* //' | while read dirfile; do outfile="$(echo "$(basename "$dirfile")" | unaccent UTF-8)"; mv "$dirfile" "$(dirname "$dirfile")/$outfile"; done
    Patola · 2009-08-24 21:24:18 1
  • Just a quick hack to give reasonable filenames to TrueType and OpenType fonts. I'd accumulated a big bunch of bizarrely and inconsistently named font files in my ~/.fonts directory. I wanted to copy some, but not all, of them over to my new machine, but I had no idea what many of them were. This script renames .ttf files based on the name embedded inside the font. It will also work for .otf files, but make sure you change the mv part so it gives them the proper extension. REQUIREMENTS: Bash (for extended pattern globbing), showttf (Debian has it in the fontforge-extras package), GNU grep (for context), and rev (because it's hilarious). BUGS: Well, like I said, this is a quick hack. It grew piece by piece on the command line. I only needed to do this once and spent hardly any time on it, so it's a bit goofy. For example, I find 'rev | cut -f1 | rev' pleasantly amusing --- it seems so clearly wrong, and yet it works to print the last argument. I think flexibility in expressiveness like this is part of the beauty of Unix shell scripting. One-off tasks can be be written quickly, built-up as a person is "thinking aloud" at the command line. That's why Unix is such a huge boost to productivity: it allows each person to think their own way instead of enforcing some "right way". On a tangent: One of the things I wish commandlinefu would show is the command line HISTORY of the person as they developed the script. I think it's that conversation between programmer and computer, as the pipeline is built piece-by-piece, that is the more valuable lesson than any canned script. Show Sample Output


    2
    shopt -s extglob; for f in *.ttf *.TTF; do g=$(showttf "$f" 2>/dev/null | grep -A1 "language=0.*FullName" | tail -1 | rev | cut -f1 | rev); g=${g##+( )}; mv -i "$f" "$g".ttf; done
    hackerb9 · 2010-04-30 09:46:45 0

  • 2
    lynx -dump -listonly 'url' | grep -oe 'http://.*\.ogg' > 11 ; vlc 11 ; mv 11 /dev/null
    narcissus · 2010-04-30 11:49:35 0
  • In a folder with many files and folders, you want to move all files where the date is >= the file olderFilesNameToMove and


    2
    sudo find . -maxdepth 1 -cnewer olderFilesNameToMove -and ! -cnewer newerFileNameToMove -exec mv -v {} /newDirectory/ \;
    javamaniac · 2010-06-30 20:40:30 0
  • Thanks to flatcap for optimizing this command. This command takes advantage of the ext4 filesystem's resistance to fragmentation. By using this command, files that were previously fragmented will be copied / deleted / pasted essentially giving the filesystem another chance at saving the file contiguously. ( unlike FAT / NTFS, the *nix filesystem always try to save a file without fragmenting it ) My command only effects the home directory and only those files with your R/W (read / write ) permissions. There are two issues with this command: 1. it really won't help, it works, but linux doesn't suffer much (if any ) fragmentation and even fragmented files have fast I/O 2. it doesn't discriminate between fragmented and non-fragmented files, so a large ~/ directory with no fragments will take almost as long as an equally sized fragmented ~/ directory The benefits i managed to work into the command: 1. it only defragments files under 16mb, because a large file with fragments isn't as noticeable as a small file that's fragmented, and copy/ delete/ paste of large files would take too long 2. it gives a nice countdown in the terminal so you know how far how much progress is being made and just like other defragmenters you can stop at any time ( use ctrl+c ) 3. fast! i can defrag my ~/ directory in 11 seconds thanks to the ramdrive powering the command's temporary storage bottom line: 1. its only an experiment, safe ( i've used it several times for testing ), but probably not very effective ( unless you somehow have a fragmentation problem on linux ). might be a placebo for recent windows converts looking for a defrag utility on linux and won't accept no for an answer 2. it's my first commandlinefu command Show Sample Output


    2
    find ~ -maxdepth 20 -type f -size -16M -print > t; for ((i=$(wc -l < t); i>0; i--)) do a=$(sed -n ${i}p < t); mv "$a" /dev/shm/d; mv /dev/shm/d "$a"; echo $i; done; echo DONE; rm t
    LinuxMan · 2010-07-07 04:29:22 6
  • When you have different digital cameras, different people, friends and you want to merge all those pictures together, then you get files with same names or files with 3 and 4 digit numbers etc. The result is a mess if you copy it together into one directory. But if you can add an offset to the picture number and set the number of leading zeros in the file name's number then you can manage. OFFS != 0 and LZ the same as the files currently have is not supported. Or left as an exercise, hoho ;) I love NF="${NF/#+(0)/}",it looks like a magic bash spell.


    2
    OFFS=30;LZ=6;FF=$(printf %%0%dd $LZ);for F in *.jpg;do NF="${F%.jpg}";NF="${NF/#+(0)/}";NF=$[NF+OFFS];NF="$(printf $FF $NF)".jpg;if [ "$F" != "$NF" ];then mv -iv "$F" "$NF";fi;done
    masterofdisaster · 2010-11-08 22:48:56 2
  • I think this is less resource consuming than the previous examples


    2
    mv * .[0-9a-Z]* ../; cd ..; rm -r $OLDPWD
    Elisiano · 2010-11-12 11:03:58 2
  • Batch rename extension of all files in a folder, in the example from .txt to .md


    2
    for f in *.txt; do mv $f `basename $f .txt`.md; done;
    vranx · 2010-12-09 18:29:17 0
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