Commands using mv (214)

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Speed up upgrades for a debian/ubuntu based system.
Please install aria2c before you try the above command. On ubuntu the command to install aria2c would be: $sudo aptitude install aria2

Percental CPU scaled load average
This “sysload” alias converts the load average to percentages and divides them by the number of CPUs/cores. It may provide a more intuitive guesstimate of how much work the server is doing.

Get International Space Station sighting information for your city
This command outputs a table of sighting opportunities for the International Space Station. Find the URL for your city here: http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/realdata/sightings/

List users with running processes
This is different that `who` in that who only cares about logged-in users running shells, this command will show all daemon users and what not; also users logged in remotely via SSH but are running SFTP/SCP only and not a shell.

Convert a file from ISO-8859-1 (or whatever) to UTF-8 (or whatever)
I use it sometimes when I work on a french file transferred from a windows XP to a Debian-UTF8 system. Those are not correctly displayed: ? ? ? and so on $man tcs # for all charsets

prints message in given argument on on center of screen
$ function echox { echo `tput cup $(($(tput lines))) $(( ($(tput cols) - $(echo "${#1}"))/2 ))`"$1"`tput cup $(tput lines) $(( $(tput cols)-1 ))`; } echox prints given argument on bottom line center screen in terminal $ function echoxy { echo `tput cup $(($(tput lines)/2)) $(( ($(tput cols) - $(echo "${#1}"))/2))`"$1"`tput cup $(tput lines) $(( $(tput cols)-1 ))`; } exhoxy prints given argument center screen $ function echos { echo `tput cup $(($(tput lines)-2)) $(($(tput cols)-$(echo ${#1})))&&tput sc`"$1"`tput cup $(($(tput lines)-2)) 0 && tput rc`; } $ while [ 1 ]; do echos "`date`"; done echos prints date and time on second from last line (used as status message) you can easily use these functions by placing them in your .bashrc file, make sure to source your .bashrc once you do

convert unixtime to human-readable with awk
- convert unixtime to human-readable with awk - useful to read logfiles with unix-timestamps, f.e. squid-log: sudo tail -f /var/log/squid3/access.log | awk '{ print strftime("%c ", $1) $0; }

list files recursively by size

ignore the .svn directory in filename completion
When browsing java source code (for example) it's really annoying having to type the first letter of the package when there is only one package in the subdir. man bash for more info about FIGNORE

Down for everyone or just me?
Check if a site is down with downforeveryoneorjustme.com


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