Commands using mv (193)


  • -4
    for i in *; do mv $i prependtext$i; done
    stubby · 2010-08-14 14:57:20 2
  • Prepends all directory items with "prependtext"


    -4
    ls | while read -r FILE; do mv -v "$FILE" `echo "prependtext$FILE" `; done
    IgnitionWeb · 2010-08-14 14:19:18 0
  • all files in the directory get moved, in doing so the new name of the file is the original name with out spaces (using translate command)


    -3
    ls | while read -r FILE; do mv -v "$FILE" `echo $FILE | tr -d ' '`; done
    IgnitionWeb · 2010-08-14 14:10:48 0
  • This heavy one liner gets all the files in the "/music/dir/" directory and filters for non 44.1 mp3 files. After doing this it passes the names to sox in-order to re-sample those files. The original files are left just in case.


    -2
    file /music/dir/* | grep -v 44.1 | sed 's/:.*//g' | grep .mp3 | { while IFS= read; do filebak="\"$REPLY.original\""; file="\"$REPLY\""; mv $file $filebak; sox -t mp3 $filebak $file rate 44k; done; };
    IgnitionWeb · 2010-08-12 21:53:28 0

  • 1
    find ./* -mtime +60 -exec mv {} storeFolder \;
    antonangeli · 2010-07-19 18:06:06 1
  • Thanks th John_W for suggesting the fix allowing ~/ to be used when saving a directory. directions: Type in a url, it will show a preview of what the file will look like when saved, then asks if you want to save the preview and where you want to save it. Great for grabbing the latest commandlinefu commands without a full web browser or even a GUI. Requires: w3m Show Sample Output


    0
    read -p "enter url:" a ; w3m -dump $a > /dev/shm/e1q ; less /dev/shm/e1q ; read -p "save file as text (y/n)?" b ; if [ $b = "y" ] ; then read -p "enter path with filename:" c && touch $(eval echo "$c") ; mv /dev/shm/e1q $(eval echo "$c") ; fi ; echo DONE
    LinuxMan · 2010-07-13 22:36:38 2
  • I wrote this script to speed up Nginx configs. This (long) one liner can be run via BASH. You will see that we set a variable in bash called 'foo' and the streamline editor (sed) finds 'bar' in 'foo.conf' next it writes that output to a temp file (foo.temp) and removes the first 5 lines (that aren't needed in this case) & lastly it moves (overwrites) foo.temp to foo.conf Show Sample Output


    0
    variable="foo" && sed 's/bar/'$variable'/g' $variable.conf >> $variable.temp && sed '1,5d' $variable.temp && mv $variable.temp $variable.conf
    jdorfman · 2010-07-09 22:12:51 0
  • We normally get tasks in which one has to sort a data file according to some column. For a single file say foo, we would use sort -k 3 foo >tmp && tmp foo The for loop is useful when we have to do it on a number of files.


    -2
    for x in *.dat;do sort -k 3 $x >tmp && mv -f tmp $x;done
    rajarshi · 2010-07-07 07:57:37 2
  • Thanks to flatcap for optimizing this command. This command takes advantage of the ext4 filesystem's resistance to fragmentation. By using this command, files that were previously fragmented will be copied / deleted / pasted essentially giving the filesystem another chance at saving the file contiguously. ( unlike FAT / NTFS, the *nix filesystem always try to save a file without fragmenting it ) My command only effects the home directory and only those files with your R/W (read / write ) permissions. There are two issues with this command: 1. it really won't help, it works, but linux doesn't suffer much (if any ) fragmentation and even fragmented files have fast I/O 2. it doesn't discriminate between fragmented and non-fragmented files, so a large ~/ directory with no fragments will take almost as long as an equally sized fragmented ~/ directory The benefits i managed to work into the command: 1. it only defragments files under 16mb, because a large file with fragments isn't as noticeable as a small file that's fragmented, and copy/ delete/ paste of large files would take too long 2. it gives a nice countdown in the terminal so you know how far how much progress is being made and just like other defragmenters you can stop at any time ( use ctrl+c ) 3. fast! i can defrag my ~/ directory in 11 seconds thanks to the ramdrive powering the command's temporary storage bottom line: 1. its only an experiment, safe ( i've used it several times for testing ), but probably not very effective ( unless you somehow have a fragmentation problem on linux ). might be a placebo for recent windows converts looking for a defrag utility on linux and won't accept no for an answer 2. it's my first commandlinefu command Show Sample Output


    2
    find ~ -maxdepth 20 -type f -size -16M -print > t; for ((i=$(wc -l < t); i>0; i--)) do a=$(sed -n ${i}p < t); mv "$a" /dev/shm/d; mv /dev/shm/d "$a"; echo $i; done; echo DONE; rm t
    LinuxMan · 2010-07-07 04:29:22 6
  • Checks if a web page has changed. Put it into cron to check periodically. Change http://www.page.de/test.html and mail@mail.de for your needs.


    3
    HTMLTEXT=$( curl -s http://www.page.de/test.html > /tmp/new.html ; diff /tmp/new.html /tmp/old.html ); if [ "x$HTMLTEXT" != x ] ; then echo $HTMLTEXT | mail -s "Page has changed." mail@mail.de ; fi ; mv /tmp/new.html /tmp/old.html
    Emzy · 2010-07-04 21:45:37 1
  • In a folder with many files and folders, you want to move all files where the date is >= the file olderFilesNameToMove and


    2
    sudo find . -maxdepth 1 -cnewer olderFilesNameToMove -and ! -cnewer newerFileNameToMove -exec mv -v {} /newDirectory/ \;
    javamaniac · 2010-06-30 20:40:30 0
  • Simple bash/ksh/sh command to rename all files from lower to upper case. If you want to do other stuff you can change the tr command to a sed or awk... and/or change mv to cp....


    1
    for n in * ; do mv $n `echo $n | tr '[:lower:]' '[:upper:]'`; done
    max_allan · 2010-06-25 19:20:04 3
  • This renames a pattern matched bunch of files by their last modified time. rename by timestamp rename by time created rename by time modified Show Sample Output


    0
    for i in somefiles*.png ; do echo "$i" ; N=$(stat -c %Y $i); mv -i $i $N.png; done
    sufoo · 2010-06-01 19:28:05 0

  • 2
    lynx -dump -listonly 'url' | grep -oe 'http://.*\.ogg' > 11 ; vlc 11 ; mv 11 /dev/null
    narcissus · 2010-04-30 11:49:35 0
  • Just a quick hack to give reasonable filenames to TrueType and OpenType fonts. I'd accumulated a big bunch of bizarrely and inconsistently named font files in my ~/.fonts directory. I wanted to copy some, but not all, of them over to my new machine, but I had no idea what many of them were. This script renames .ttf files based on the name embedded inside the font. It will also work for .otf files, but make sure you change the mv part so it gives them the proper extension. REQUIREMENTS: Bash (for extended pattern globbing), showttf (Debian has it in the fontforge-extras package), GNU grep (for context), and rev (because it's hilarious). BUGS: Well, like I said, this is a quick hack. It grew piece by piece on the command line. I only needed to do this once and spent hardly any time on it, so it's a bit goofy. For example, I find 'rev | cut -f1 | rev' pleasantly amusing --- it seems so clearly wrong, and yet it works to print the last argument. I think flexibility in expressiveness like this is part of the beauty of Unix shell scripting. One-off tasks can be be written quickly, built-up as a person is "thinking aloud" at the command line. That's why Unix is such a huge boost to productivity: it allows each person to think their own way instead of enforcing some "right way". On a tangent: One of the things I wish commandlinefu would show is the command line HISTORY of the person as they developed the script. I think it's that conversation between programmer and computer, as the pipeline is built piece-by-piece, that is the more valuable lesson than any canned script. Show Sample Output


    2
    shopt -s extglob; for f in *.ttf *.TTF; do g=$(showttf "$f" 2>/dev/null | grep -A1 "language=0.*FullName" | tail -1 | rev | cut -f1 | rev); g=${g##+( )}; mv -i "$f" "$g".ttf; done
    hackerb9 · 2010-04-30 09:46:45 0
  • Need to have rc iso pre-downloaded before running command.


    4
    mv ubuntu-10.04-rc-desktop-amd64.iso ubuntu-10.04-desktop-amd64.iso; i=http://releases.ubuntu.com/10.04/ubuntu-10.04-desktop-amd64.iso.zsync; while true; do if wget $i; then zsync $i; date; break; else sleep 30; fi; done
    stinkerweed999 · 2010-04-29 15:49:43 0
  • Some commands (such as sed and perl) have options to support in-place editing of files, but many commands do not. This shell function enables any command to change files in place. See the sample output for many examples. The function uses plain sh syntax and works with any POSIX shell or derivative, including zsh and bash. Show Sample Output


    1
    inplace() { eval F=\"\$$#\"; "$@" > "$F".new && mv -f "$F".new "$F"; }
    inof · 2010-04-09 11:36:31 8
  • This got a bit complicated, because I had to introduce an additional dot at the end that has to be removed again later.


    -1
    for each in *; do file="$each."; name=${file%%.*}; suffix=${file#*.}; mv "$each" "$(echo $name | rot13)${suffix:+.}${suffix%.}"; done
    hfs · 2010-03-20 16:11:12 3
  • Find every file and move it to current directory.


    11
    find -type f -exec mv {} . \;
    and3k · 2010-03-02 07:09:45 1
  • You WILL have problems if the files have the same name. Use cases: consolidate music library and unify photos (especially if your camera separates images by dates). After running the command and verifying if there was no name issues, you can use ls -d */ | sed -e 's/^/\"/g' -e 's/$/\"/g' | xargs rm -r to remove now empty subdirectories.


    -1
    ls -d */* | sed -e 's/^/\"/g' -e 's/$/\"/g' | xargs mv -t $(pwd)
    leovailati · 2010-03-01 23:43:26 2
  • I constantly need to work on my local computer, thus I need a way to download the codeigniter user guide, this is the wget way I figured.


    -1
    wget -r --no-parent http://codeigniter.com/user_guide/ ; mv codeigniter.com/user_guide/* . ; rm -rf codeigniter.com
    jimthunderbird · 2010-03-01 02:37:26 0

  • -5
    for file in `find . -iname "FILENAME"`; do cat $file | sed "s/SEARCH_STRING/REPLACE_STRING/" > $file.tmp; mv $file.tmp $file; done
    unixmonkey6754 · 2010-02-24 13:46:29 0
  • Renames duplicates from MusicBrainz Picard, so you get the latest copy and not a bunch of duplicates. Show Sample Output


    1
    for i in */*/*\(1\)*; do mv -f "$i" "${i/ (1)}"; done
    magenine · 2010-01-30 03:11:55 0
  • I realize there's a few of these out there, but none exactly in this form, which seems the cleanest to me


    9
    for f in *;do mv "$f" "${f// /_}";done
    ethanmiller · 2010-01-29 19:57:16 2

  • -1
    find . -maxdepth 1 -type f| xargs sha1sum | sed 's/^\(\w*\)\s*\(.*\)/\2 \1/' | while read LINE; do mv $LINE; done
    foremire · 2010-01-25 20:21:01 8
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