Commands using nl (24)


  • 26
    nl
    solarislackware · 2009-12-08 19:30:32 3

  • 5
    git reflog show | grep '}: commit' | nl | sort -nr | nl | sort -nr | cut --fields=1,3 | sed s/commit://g | sed -e 's/HEAD*@{[0-9]*}://g'
    jimthunderbird · 2010-03-09 07:44:05 0
  • Add permanent line numbers to a file without creating a temp file. The rm command deletes file10 while the nl command works on the open file descriptor of file10 which it outputs into a new file again named file10. The new file10 will now be numbered in the same directory with the same file name and content as before, but it will in fact be a new file, using (ls -i) to show its inode number will prove this.


    3
    { rm -f file10 && nl > file10; } < file10
    zlemini · 2010-04-08 21:08:23 4
  • Low on disk space? Check the largest installed RPMs for delete canditates. Show Sample Output


    2
    rpm -qa --qf '%{SIZE} %{NAME}\n' | sort -nr | nl | head -6 # six largest RPMs
    mpb · 2009-03-15 22:18:17 0

  • 2
    nl file.txt > file_numbered.txt
    totti · 2011-09-14 20:10:49 1

  • 1
    git log --reverse --pretty=oneline | cut -c41- | nl | sort -nr
    jimthunderbird · 2010-02-24 19:36:20 0
  • Interesting to see which packages are larger than the kernel package. Useful to understand which RPMs might be candidates to remove if drive space is restricted. Show Sample Output


    1
    rpm -qa --queryformat '%{size} %{name}-%{version}-%{release}\n' | sort -k 1,1 -rn | nl | head -16
    mpb · 2013-03-19 21:10:54 0

  • 1
    read -p "Please enter the 4chan url: "|egrep '//i.4cdn.org/[a-z0-9]+/src/([0-9]*).(jpg|png|gif)' - -o|nl -s https:|cut -c7-|uniq|wget -nc -i - --random-wait
    unixmonkey73764 · 2014-03-09 05:56:14 0
  • I copied this (let's be honest) somewhere on internet and I just made it as a function ready to be used as alias. It shows the 10 most used commands from history. This seems to be just another "most used commands from history", but hey.. this is a function!!! :D Show Sample Output


    1
    mosth() { history | awk '{CMD[$2]++;count++;}END { for (a in CMD)print CMD[a] " " CMD[a]/count*100 "% " a;}' | grep -v "./" | column -c3 -s " " -t | sort -nr | nl | head -n10; }
    nnsense · 2015-05-11 17:41:55 3
  • Print a git log (in reverse order) giving a reference relative to HEAD. HEAD (the current revision) can also be referred to as HEAD~0 The previous revision is HEAD~1 then HEAD~2 etc. . Add line numbers to the git output, starting at zero: ... | nl -v0 | ... . Insert the string 'HEAD~' before the number using sed: ... | sed 's/^ \+/&HEAD~/' . Thanks to bartonski for the idea :-) Show Sample Output


    1
    git log --oneline | nl -v0 | sed 's/^ \+/&HEAD~/'
    flatcap · 2015-11-23 21:35:57 0

  • 1
    lynx -listonly -nonumbers -dump https://djmag.com/top100djs|sed '1d'|cut -d- -f5,6,7|sed -n '180,$p'|nl --number-format=rn --number-width=3|sed 's/-/ /g'|sed -e 's/.*/\L&/' -e 's/\<./\u&/g'
    wuziduzi · 2019-01-20 08:23:18 1
  • This function is used to sort selected lines of a text file to the end of that file. Especially useful in cases where human intervention is necessary to sort out parts of a file. Let's say that you have a text file which contains the words rough slimy red fluff dough For whatever reason, you want to sort all words rhyming with 'tough' to the bottom of the file, and all words denoting colors to the top, while keeping the order of the rest of the file intact. '$EDITOR' will open, showing all of the lines in the given file, numbered with '0' padding. Adding a '~' to the beginning of the line will cause the line to sort to the end of the file, adding '!' will cause it to sort to the beginning. Show Sample Output


    0
    2end () ( export LC_ALL=C; nl -n rz $1 > $1.tmp; ${EDITOR:-vi} $1.tmp; sort $1.tmp | sed -r 's/^.*[0-9]+\t+//' > $1; rm $1.tmp; )
    bartonski · 2010-03-06 23:02:28 3
  • usage: dng BRE [selection] default selection is the last match DNS is ok, but although domainnames may be easier to remember than IP numbers, it still requires typing them out. This can be error-prone. Even more so than typing IPv4 numbers, depending on the domainname, its length and complexity.


    0
    dng(){ local a;a=$(sed '/'"$1"'/!d' /etc/hosts |sed '=;'"${2-1,$}"'!d'|sed '/ /!d');echo $a|tr '\040' '\n'|nl -bp'[0-9]$'|less -E;export dn=$(echo $a|sed 's,.* ,,');export ip=$(echo $a|sed 's, .*,,');echo \$dn=$dn;echo \$ip=$ip;}
    argv · 2012-04-01 23:57:09 0
  • "nl -ba" numbers all lines in the file (including empty lines), "sort -nr" sorts the lines in descending order, and the "cut" command finally removes the line numbers again.


    0
    nl -ba FILE | sort -nr | cut -f2-
    maher · 2012-06-24 23:07:06 1
  • This command print the last line of a file with in first position the total lines number. Show Sample Output


    0
    nl FILE_NAME | tail -n 1
    P3ter · 2013-07-04 21:54:59 0
  • perhaps you should use CMD[$2] instead of CMD[$4] Show Sample Output


    0
    history | awk '{CMD[$4]++;count++;} END { for (a in CMD )print CMD[a] " " CMD[a]/count*100 "% " a }' | sort -nr | nl | column -t | head -n 10
    jasee · 2013-07-05 02:38:04 0
  • In addition one can evaluate the formulas in the venerable spreadsheet command sc, with an additional command. function csvev () { cat $1 | sed -e '1i,,,,,,,' |sed -e 's/=sum/@sum/g' -e 's/=SUM/@SUM/g' | psc -k -d, | sed -e 's/\"@SUM(/@SUM(/' -e 's/)"/)/' | sed '/@SUM/ { s/rightstring/let/; }' | sed -e '/= "=/s/rightstring/let/' -e '/= "=/s/"//g' | sed 's/= =/= /g' | sc ; } I will post this command separately as well. Show Sample Output


    0
    function sheet () { cat "$1" | sed '1s/^/a,b,c,d,e,f,g,h,j,k,l,m,n,o,p\n/' | column -s , -tn | nl -v 0 ; }
    eakinc · 2015-07-13 03:14:35 0
  • This is how you can do this without having to use oneline Show Sample Output


    0
    git log | nl -w9 -v0 --body-numbering='pcommit\ [0-9a-f]\{40\}' | sed 's/^ \+\([0-9]\+\)\s\+/HEAD~\1 /'
    guywithnose · 2015-11-23 21:53:33 0
  • by determining most popular use in history using percentage . Show Sample Output


    0
    history | awk '{CMD[$2]++;count++;}END { for (a in CMD)print CMD[a] " " CMD[a]/count*100 "% " a;}' | grep -v "./" | column -c3 -s " " -t | sort -nr | nl | head -n10
    turrtle13 · 2016-04-24 17:21:35 0
  • Display a list of the 16 most recently installed RPM packages with newest first. Show Sample Output


    0
    rpm -qa --queryformat '%{INSTALLTIME} %{name}-%{version}-%{release}\n' | sort -k 1,1 -rn | nl | head -16 | awk '{printf("%3d %s %s\n", $1,strftime("%c",$2),$3)}'
    mpb · 2018-09-12 17:47:26 1
  • Next time you see a mac fanboy bragging about 64-bitness of 10.6 give him this so he might sh? Show Sample Output


    -1
    file /System/Library/Extensions/*.kext/Contents/MacOS/* |grep -i x86_64 |nl |tail -1 |cut -f1 -f3 && file /System/Library/Extensions/*.kext/Contents/MacOS/* |grep -v x86_64 |nl |tail -1 |cut -f1 -f3
    commandlinefu · 2009-09-03 14:28:02 3
  • Works in RHEL5 and derivatives.


    -1
    nl <filename>
    SuperFly · 2010-01-06 16:14:43 0
  • The nl command lists the contents of a file where is each line is prefixed by a line number. For more information about this command, check out its man page. I tested under Mac OS X and Xubuntu 9.04


    -2
    nl filename | more
    haivu · 2009-05-04 07:35:16 3
  • Not as far off as you thought, now is it? -mac fanboy Show Sample Output


    -2
    file /System/Library/Extensions/*.kext/Contents/MacOS/* |grep -i x86_64 |nl | tail -1 | cut -f1 -f3; file /System/Library/Extensions/*.kext/Contents/MacOS/* |grep -i "mach-o object i386" |nl | tail -1 | cut -f1 -f3
    digitalshadow · 2009-09-11 16:43:27 1

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Print out a man page
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Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
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Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
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