Commands using perl (368)

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Pack up some files into a tarball on a remote server without writing to the local filesystem
I recently found myself with a filesystem I couldn't write to and a bunch of files I had to get the hell out of dodge, preferably not one at a time. This command makes it possible to pack a bunch of files into a single archive and write it to a remote server.

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Fast search in man files or bz-files by keyword direct by man or bz files
For example we need find fast where located and described keyword COMMIT_EDITMSG in man files. Here example howto solve it by search with command bzgrep in man files. Generally these files in bz compressed format. You can use another keywords to your search. Common syntax is: bzgrep -lE keyword1 /usr/share/man/man?/optional-keyword-to-refine* or bzgrep -lE keyword1 /usr/share/man/man?/* where optional-keyword-to-refine is optional and may be omitted but used to speedup search Of course you may combine other options for bzgrep (its based on grep)

Create the directoty recursively

Show me just the ip address
Sometimes it's useful to output just the ip address. Or some other information, changing the "ipv4.addresses" in command. The power of awk! Show all possible "greps" with $ nmcli connection show [yourInterfaceNameHere]

Massive change of file extension (bash)
Change the file extension in batch. Useful to create output file names with same input name but distinct extension by including logic inside the loop

Start screen with name and run command
Runs an instance of screen with name of "name_me" and command of "echo "hi"" To reconnect to screen instance later use: screen -r name_me

Save the list of all available commands in your box to a file
When you press TAB twice in your prompt, bash tells you something like "Display all 4567 possibilities? (y or n)" But when you press "y" you only get the list in the terminal output and, if you want to save it to a file, you have to copy it by hand from the vterm screen. With this utility you save the list to a file or pipe it to another command at will You can use the file saved list to grep for a particular pattern, useful if you are searching for a command but you only remember a few letters

quickly backup or copy a file with bash
less symbols, tab completion. including # export SIMPLE_BACKUP_SUFFIX="_`date +%F`" in your .bashrc provides you to easily timestamp your files

Print a row of characters across the terminal
Pure Bash This will print a row of characters the width of the screen without using any external executables. In some cases, COLUMNS may not be set. Here is an alternative that uses tput to generate a default if that's the case. And it still avoids using tr. $ printf -v row "%${COLUMNS:-$(tput cols)}s"; echo ${row// /#} The only disadvantage to either one is that they create a variable.


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