Commands using perl (355)

  • Perl variant of echo several blank lines command


    -2
    perl -e 'print "\n"x100'
    SunX · 2010-09-07 10:11:10 0
  • Function: char * crypt (const char *key, const char *salt) The crypt function takes a password, key, as a string, and a salt character array which is described below, and returns a printable ASCII string which starts with another salt. It is believed that, given the output of the function, the best way to find a key that will produce that output is to guess values of key until the original value of key is found. The salt parameter does two things. Firstly, it selects which algorithm is used, the MD5-based one or the DES-based one. Secondly, it makes life harder for someone trying to guess passwords against a file containing many passwords; without a salt, an intruder can make a guess, run crypt on it once, and compare the result with all the passwords. With a salt, the intruder must run crypt once for each different salt. For the MD5-based algorithm, the salt should consist of the string $1$, followed by up to 8 characters, terminated by either another $ or the end of the string. The result of crypt will be the salt, followed by a $ if the salt didn't end with one, followed by 22 characters from the alphabet ./0-9A-Za-z, up to 34 characters total. Every character in the key is significant. For the DES-based algorithm, the salt should consist of two characters from the alphabet ./0-9A-Za-z, and the result of crypt will be those two characters followed by 11 more from the same alphabet, 13 in total. Only the first 8 characters in the key are significant. Show Sample Output


    0
    useradd -m -p $(perl -e'print crypt("pass", "mb")') user
    mariusbutuc · 2010-09-03 19:00:56 0
  • usefull for posts via wget Show Sample Output


    1
    perl -MURI::Escape -e 'print uri_escape("String encoded to a url");'
    glaudiston · 2010-08-30 14:06:02 1
  • All with only one pipe. Should be much faster as well (sort is slow). Use find instead of ls for recursion or reliability. Edit: case insensitive Show Sample Output


    -3
    ls | perl -lne '++$x{lc $1} if /[.](.+)$/ }{ print for keys %x'
    recursiverse · 2010-08-13 20:05:15 1

  • -1
    perl -e 'print 1+1 ."\n";'
    stubby · 2010-08-08 23:19:10 0
  • This version works on an AIX system on which I have very limited permissions. The other version fails with "Can't open file /usr/opt/perl588/lib/site_perl/5.8.8/aix/auto/DBI/.packlist".


    2
    perl -MFile::Find=find -MFile::Spec::Functions -Tlwe 'find { wanted => sub { print canonpath $_ if /\.pm\z/ }, no_chdir => 1 }, @INC'
    randy909 · 2010-08-02 15:18:51 0
  • This will show you any links that a command follows (unlike 'file -L'), as well as the ultimate binary or script. Put the name of the command at the very end; this will be passed to perl as the first argument. For obvious reasons, this doesn't work with aliases or functions. Show Sample Output


    0
    perl -le 'chomp($w=`which $ARGV[0]`);$_=`file $w`;while(/link\b/){chomp($_=(split/`/,$_)[1]);chop$_;$w.=" -> $_";$_=`file $_`;}print "\n$w";' COMMAND_NAME
    dbbolton · 2010-07-30 19:26:35 2
  • Replace DOS character ^M with newline using perl inline replace.


    -1
    perl -pi -e "s/\r/\n/g" <file>
    din7 · 2010-07-29 16:07:36 1
  • Works only if modules are installed "the right way"


    6
    perl -MExtUtils::Installed -e '$inst = ExtUtils::Installed->new(); @modules = $inst->modules(); print join("\n", @modules);'
    braak · 2010-07-20 15:47:32 1
  • This will list all symlinks that are directories under the current directory. This will help you distinguish them from regular files.


    -1
    ls -l $(find ./ -type l | perl -ne 'chomp; if (-d) { print "$_\n" }')
    rwadkins · 2010-07-16 19:31:28 0
  • Here's a version that uses perl. If you'd like a trailing newline: perl -pe 's/(.)/sprintf("\\x%x", ord($1))/eg; END {print "\n"}'


    1
    echo -n 'text' | perl -pe 's/(.)/sprintf("\\x%x", ord($1))/eg'
    putnamhill · 2010-07-14 12:20:42 0
  • Full Command: google contacts list name,name,email|perl -pne 's%^((?!N\/A)(.+?)),((?!N\/A)(.+?)),([a-z0-9\._-]+\@([a-z0-9][a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9]\.)+([a-z]+\.)?([a-z]+))%${1}:${3} <${5}>%imx'|grep -oP '^((?!N\/A)(.+?)) <[a-z0-9\._-]+\@([a-z0-9][a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9]\.)+([a-z]+\.)?([a-z]+)>' | sort You'll need googlecl and python-gdata. First setup google cl via: google Then give your PC access google contacts list name,email Then do the command, save it or use this one to dump it in the cone-address.txt file in your home dir: google contacts list name,name,email | perl -p -n -e 's%^((?!N\/A)(.+?)),((?!N\/A)(.+?)),([a-z0-9\._-]+\@([a-z0-9][a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9]\.)+([a-z]+\.)?([a-z]+))%${1}:${3} <${5}>%imx' | grep -o -P '^((?!N\/A)(.+?)) <[a-z0-9\._-]+\@([a-z0-9][a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9]\.)+([a-z]+\.)?([a-z]+)>' | sort > ~/cone-adress.txt Then import into cone. It filters out multiple emails, and contacts with no email that have N/A. (Picasa photo persons without email for example...) Show Sample Output


    1
    google contacts list name,name,email|perl -pne 's%^((?!N\/A)(.+?)),((?!N\/A)(.+?)),([a-z0-9\._-]+\@([a-z0-9][a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9]\.)+([a-z]+\.)?([a-z]+))%${1}:${3} <${5}>%imx' #see below for full command
    Raymii · 2010-07-12 16:50:44 3
  • Print "Art of hacking..." 100 times by perl or you can this tools : http://packetstormsecurity.org/shellcode/shellcodeencdec.py.txt Show Sample Output


    -15
    perl -e 'print "\x41\x72\x74\x20\x6f\x66\x20\x68\x61\x63\x6b\x69\x6e\x67\x2e\x2e\x2e\n" x 100'
    gunslinger_ · 2010-07-11 16:32:00 0
  • Replaces tabs in output with spaces. Uses perl since sed seems to work differently across platforms.


    -3
    cat file_with_tabs.txt | perl -pe 's/\t/ /g'
    nikc · 2010-07-11 13:01:22 4
  • This includes a title attribute so you can see the file name by hovering over an image. Also will hoover up any image format - jpg, gif and png.


    1
    find . | perl -wne 'chomp; print qq|<img src="$_" title="$_" /><br />| if /\.(jpg|gif|png)$/;'> gallery.html
    spotrick · 2010-07-04 01:43:50 1
  • only output the ip addres. I put double pipe with sed because not parse with operator OR (|) in redex. Show Sample Output


    0
    ifconfig eth0 | perl -ne "print if m/inet addr:((\d+\.){3})+/" | sed "s/inet addr//" | sed "s/Bcast//" |awk -F: '{print $2}'
    aceiro · 2010-06-26 12:07:15 1

  • -1
    ifconfig eth0 | perl -ne 'print $1 if m/addr:((?:\d+\.){3}\d+)/'
    mensa13 · 2010-06-26 10:41:09 0
  • Personally, I save this in a one line script called ~/bin/sci: #!/bin/bash for pid in `screen -ls | grep -v $STY | grep tached | awk '{print $1;}' | perl -nle '$_ =~ /^(\d+)/; print $1;'`; do screen -x $pid; done I also use: alias scx='screen -x' alias scl='screen -ls | grep -v $STY'


    0
    for pid in `screen -ls | grep -v $STY | grep tached | awk '{print $1;}' | perl -nle '$_ =~ /^(\d+)/; print $1;'`; do screen -x $pid; done
    tmsh · 2010-06-22 23:06:31 0
  • On-the-fly conversion of Unix Time to human-readable in Squid's access.log Show Sample Output


    1
    perl -p -e 's/^([0-9]*)/"[".localtime($1)."]"/e' < /var/log/squid/access.log
    KoRoVaMiLK · 2010-06-22 08:42:40 0
  • Requires Net::Twitter. Just replace the double quoted strings with the appropriate info.


    2
    perl -MNet::Twitter -e '$nt = Net::Twitter->new(traits => [qw/API::REST/], username => "YOUR USERNAME", password => "YOUR PASSWORD"); $ud = $nt->update("YOUR TWEET");'
    dbbolton · 2010-06-16 19:46:05 1

  • 1
    git log -p -z | perl -ln0e 'print if /[+-].*searchedstring/'
    takeshin · 2010-06-13 07:41:22 0
  • TIMTOWTDI


    1
    perl -e 'chomp($k=`uname -r`); for (</boot/vm*>) {s/^.*vmlinuz-($k)?//; $l.="linux-image-$_ ";} system "aptitude remove $l";'
    dbbolton · 2010-06-10 22:16:47 0
  • I was tired of the endless quoting, unquoting, re-quoting, and escaping characters that left me with working, but barely comprehensible shell one-liners. It can be really frustrating, especially if the local and remote shells differ and have their own escaping and quoting rules. I decided to try a different approach and ended up with this.


    0
    perl -e 'system @ARGV, <STDIN>' ssh host -l user < cmd.txt
    recursiverse · 2010-06-04 17:27:20 0
  • Based on the execute with timeout command in this site. A more complex script: #!/bin/sh # This script will check the avaliability of a list of NFS mount point, # forcing a remount of those that do not respond in 5 seconds. # # It basically does this: # NFSPATH=/mountpoint TIMEOUT=5; perl -e "alarm $TIMEOUT; exec @ARGV" "test -d $NFSPATH" || (umount -fl $NFSPATH; mount $NFSPATH) # TIMEOUT=5 SCRIPT_NAME=$(basename $0) for i in $@; do echo "Checking $i..." if ! perl -e "alarm $TIMEOUT; exec @ARGV" "test -d $i" > /dev/null 2>&1; then echo "$SCRIPT_NAME: $i is failing with retcode $?."1>&2 echo "$SCRIPT_NAME: Submmiting umount -fl $i" 1>&2 umount -fl $i; echo "$SCRIPT_NAME: Submmiting mount $i" 1>&2 mount $i; fi done


    8
    NFSPATH=/mountpoint TIMEOUT=5; perl -e "alarm $TIMEOUT; exec @ARGV" "test -d $NFSPATH" || (umount -fl $NFSPATH; mount $NFSPATH)
    keymon · 2010-06-04 07:59:00 0
  • Based on the execute with timeout command in this site. A more complex script: #!/bin/sh # This script will check the avaliability of a list of NFS mount point, # forcing a remount of those that do not respond in 5 seconds. # # It basically does this: # NFSPATH=/mountpoint TIMEOUT=5; perl -e "alarm $TIMEOUT; exec @ARGV" "test -d $NFSPATH" || (umount -fl $NFSPATH; mount $NFSPATH) # TIMEOUT=5 SCRIPT_NAME=$(basename $0) for i in $@; do echo "Checking $i..." if ! perl -e "alarm $TIMEOUT; exec @ARGV" "test -d $i" > /dev/null 2>&1; then echo "$SCRIPT_NAME: $i is failing with retcode $?."1>&2 echo "$SCRIPT_NAME: Submmiting umount -fl $i" 1>&2 umount -fl $i; echo "$SCRIPT_NAME: Submmiting mount $i" 1>&2 mount $i; fi done


    -1
    NFSPATH=/mountpoint TIMEOUT=5; perl -e "alarm $TIMEOUT; exec @ARGV" "test -d $NFSPATH" || (umount -fl $NFSPATH; mount $NFSPATH)
    keymon · 2010-06-04 07:58:53 0
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