Commands using python (78)

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Query Wikipedia via console over DNS
Shorter version, works with multiple words.

monitor network traffic and throughput in real time
see http://iptraf.seul.org/ for all kinds of documentation and screenshots

du command without showing other mounted file systems

revert a committed change in SVN
This command can be used to revert a particular changeset in the local copy. I find this useful because I frequently import files into the wrong directory. After the import it says "Committed revision 123" or similar. to revert this change in the working copy do: svn merge -c -123 . (don't forget the .) and then commit.

Rename files in batch

Find ASCII files and extract IP addresses

Create full backups of individual folders using find and tar-gzip
Problem: I wanted to backup user data individually. In this example, all user data is located in "/mnt/storage/profiles", and about 25 folders inside, each with a username ( /mnt/storage/profiles/mike; /mnt/storage/profiles/lucy ...) I need each individual folder backed up, not the whole "/mnt/storage/profiles". So, using find while excluding directories depth and creating two variables (tarfile=username & desdir=destination), tar will create a .tgz file for each folder, resulting in a "mike_full.tgz" and "lucy_full.tgz".

A very quick and slick fork bomb. Handle with care. Don't run on production please...

Carriage return for reprinting on the same line
The above code is just an example of printing on the same line, hit Ctrl + C to stop When using echo -ne "something\r", echo will: - print "something" - dont print a new line (-n) - interpret \r as carriage return, going back to the start of the line (-e) Remember to print some white spaces after the output if your command will print lines of different sizes, mainly if one line will be smaller than the previous Edit from reading comments: You can achieve the same effect using printf (more standardized than echo): while true; do printf "%-80s\r" "$(date)"; sleep 1; done

Find number of computers in domain, OU, etc .


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