Commands using python (72)

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Find artist and title of a music cd, UPC code given (first result only)
I like curl better than wget, I just think that curl -s is a lot simpler than wget ... see I forget what you even have to do to get wget to pipe it's output Anyway, all in one sed command as "requested"

remove hostname from known_hosts

List of computers not logged into in more than four weeks

This allows you to find a string on a set of files recursivly
The -r is for recursive, -F for fixed strings, --include='*.txt' identifies you want all txt files to be search any wildcard will apply, then the string you are looking for and the final * to ensure you go through all files and folders within the folder you execute it.

Text graphing ping output filter
Nasty perl one-liner that provides a sparkline of ping times. If you want a different history than the last 30, just put that value in. It (ab)uses unicode to draw the bars, inspired by https://github.com/joemiller/spark-ping . It's not the most bug-free piece of code, but what it lacks in robustness it makes up for in capability. :) If anyone has any ideas on how to make it more compact or better, I'd love to hear them. I included a ping to google in the command just as an example (and burned up 10 chars doing it!). You should use it with: $ ping example.com | $SPARKLINE_PING_COMMAND

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Recursively find top 20 largest files (> 1MB) sort human readable format
Search for files and list the 20 largest. $ find . -type f gives us a list of file, recursively, starting from here (.) $ -print0 | xargs -0 du -h separate the names of files with NULL characters, so we're not confused by spaces then xargs run the du command to find their size (in human-readable form -- 64M not 64123456) $ | sort -hr use sort to arrange the list in size order. sort -h knows that 1M is bigger than 9K $ | head -20 finally only select the top twenty out of the list

Get all the keyboard shortcuts in screen
Displays a list of all the basic keyboard shortcuts in screen.

Get information about memory modules
To take information about the characteristics of the installed memory modules.

Want to known what time is it in another part of the world ?
available timezone can be found in /usr/share/zoneinfo. Other examples: $ TZ=Europe/Paris date; TZ=Australia/Sydney date; TZ=America/New_York date this is based on zoneinfo files on macosx. Your mileage my vary on other unix dialects


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