Commands using python (80)

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Bash logger

Check syntax of all Perl modules or scripts underneath the current directory
Finds all *.p[ml]-files and runs a perl -c on them, checking whether Perl thinks they are syntactically correct

Color man pages
Add the followin to ~/.bashrc #colour export LESS_TERMCAP_mb=$'\E[01;31m' export LESS_TERMCAP_md=$'\E[01;37m' export LESS_TERMCAP_me=$'\E[0m' export LESS_TERMCAP_se=$'\E[0m' export LESS_TERMCAP_so=$'\E[01;44;33m' export LESS_TERMCAP_ue=$'\E[0m' export LESS_TERMCAP_us=$'\E[01;32m'

open path with your default GNOME program
Another step to bring cli and gui closer together: gnome-open It opens a path with the default (gui) application for its mime type. I would recommend a shorter alias like alias o=gnome-open More examples: $ gnome-open . [opens the current folder in nautilus / your default file browser] $ gnome-open some.pdf [opens some.pdf in evince / your default pdf viewer] $ gnome-open trash:// [opens the trash with nautilus] $ gnome-open http://www.commandlinefu.com [opens commandlinefu in your default webbrowser]

find with high precission (nanoseconds 1/1,000,000,000s) the last changed file.
this is good for variables if you have many script created files and if you want to know which one is the last created/changed one..

send a .loc file to a garmin gps over usb
gps data from geocaching.com is provided for free in .loc format.

list files recursively by size

burn a isofile to cd or dvd
cdrecord must be installed. usefull alias: $alias burniso='cdrecord -v dev=/dev/cdrom' now iso burning is like. $burniso image.iso

Use nroff to view the man pages
Using nroff , it is possible to view the otherwise garbled man page with col command.

Capture all plaintext passwords


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