Commands using python (80)

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Calculate days on which Friday the 13th occurs (inspired from the work of the user justsomeguy)
Friday is the 5th day of the week, monday is the 1st. Output may be affected by locale.

Stripping ^M at end of each line for files
That "^M" is Ctrl-M, which is a carriage return, and is not needed in Unix file systems. Where ^V is actually Ctrl-V and ^M is actually Ctrl-M (you must type these yourself, don't just copy and paste this command). ^V will not be displayed on your screen.

Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials

mysql bin log events per minute
shows number of mysql bin log events (which are mysql server events) per minute, useful to check stress times postmortem

benchmark web server with apache benchmarking tool
-n 9000 : Number of requests to perform for the benchmarking session -c 900 : Number of multiple requests to perform at a time

Create a continuous digital clock in Linux terminal
Source: http://www.my-guides.net/en/guides/linux/364-how-to-create-a-continuous-digital-clock-in-linux-terminal

Watch Star Wars via telnet
Use Ctrl-] to stop it.

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Periodically run a command without hangups, and send the output to your e-mail
Run "ps -x" (process status) in the background every hour (in this example). The outputs of both "nohup" and "ps -x" are sent to the e-mail (instead of nohup.out and stdout and stderr). If you like it, replace "ps -x" by the command of your choice, replace 3600 (1 hour) by the period of your choice. You can run the command in the loop any time by killing the sleep process. For example $ ps -x 2925 ? S 0:00.00 sh -c unzip E.zip >/dev/null 2>&1 11288 ? O 0:00.00 unzip E.zip 25428 ? I 0:00.00 sleep 3600 14346 pts/42- I 0:00.01 bash -c while true; do ps -x | mail pascalv; sleep 3600; done 643 pts/66 Ss 0:00.03 -bash 14124 pts/66 O+ 0:00.00 ps -x $ kill 25428 You have mail in /mail/pascalv

Big Countdown Clock in seconds
Requires figlet. Other than that, this should be portable enough across all the Bourne-compatible shells (sh, bash, ksh, zsh, etc). Produces a massive number using figlet that counts down the number of seconds for any given minute interval. For example, here's a 4-minute timer: $ i=$((4*60)); while [ $i -gt 0 ]; do clear; echo $i | figlet; sleep 1; i=$(($i-1)); done; And a 1-minute timer: $ i=$((1*60)); while [ $i -gt 0 ]; do clear; echo $i | figlet; sleep 1; i=$(($i-1)); done;


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