Commands using read (307)

  • The given example collects output of the tail command: Whenever a line is emitted, further lines are collected, until no more output comes for one second. This group of lines is then sent as notification to the user. You can test the example with logger "First group"; sleep 1; logger "Second"; logger "group"


    1
    tail -f /var/log/messages | while read line; do accu="$line"; while read -t 1 more; do accu=`echo -e "$accu\n$more"`; done; notify-send "Syslog" "$accu"; done
    hfs · 2010-10-10 16:28:08 0
  • usage examples ls largedir |rd lynx -dump largewebsite.com |rd rd < largelogfile


    2
    rd(){ while read a ;do printf "$a\n";sleep ${1-1};done ;} # usage: rd < file ; or ... | rd
    argv · 2010-10-03 04:16:03 0
  • Say you want to time how long a task you're performing takes. Start this simple timer and you're done! Show Sample Output


    0
    time read x
    ubersoldat · 2010-09-30 09:23:01 2

  • 0
    find . -name "*.jar" | while read line; do echo "### $line "; unzip -l $line; done | grep "^###\|you-string" |less
    onk · 2010-09-28 17:51:40 0

  • 1
    find . -name "*.jar" | while read line; do unzip -l $line; done | grep your-string
    voidpointer · 2010-09-28 16:15:01 2
  • Similar to xargs -i, but works with builtin bash commands (rather than running "bash -c ..." through xargs)


    3
    xargsb() { while read -r cmd; do ${@//'{}'/$cmd}; done; }
    BobbyTables · 2010-09-28 06:35:39 3

  • 1
    echo "12 morning\n15 afternoon\n24 evening" |while read t g; do if [ `date +%H` -lt $t ]; then echo "Good $g"; break; fi; done
    dendoes · 2010-09-23 13:06:10 2
  • This script compares the modification date of /var/lib/dpkg/info/${package}.list and all the files mentioned there. It could be wrong on noatime partitions. Here is non-oneliner: #!/bin/sh package=$1; list=/var/lib/dpkg/info/${package}.list; inst=$(stat "$list" -c %X); cat $list | ( while read file; do if [ -f "$file" ]; then acc=$(stat "$file" -c %X); if [ $inst -lt $acc ]; then echo used $file exit 0 fi; fi; done exit 1 ) Show Sample Output


    1
    package=$1; list=/var/lib/dpkg/info/${package}.list; inst=$(stat "$list" -c %X); cat $list | (while read file; do if [ -f "$file" ];then acc=$(stat "$file" -c %X); if [ $inst -lt $acc ]; then echo used $file; exit 0; fi; fi; done; exit 1)
    pipeliner · 2010-09-20 18:10:19 0

  • -2
    cowsay -l | sed '1d;s/ /\n/g' | while read f; do cowsay -f $f $f;done
    fizz · 2010-09-06 03:40:42 1
  • wget --user=username --password="$password" http://example.org/ Instead of hiding commands entirely from history, I prefer to use "read" to put the password into a variable, and then use that variable in the commands instead of the password. Without the "-e" and "-s" it should work in any bourne-type shell, but the -s is what makes sure the password doesn't get echoed to the screen at all. (-e makes editing work a bit better)


    4
    read -e -s -p "Password: " password
    freiheit · 2010-08-18 17:53:27 1
  • find . -type f -iname '*.flac' # searches from the current folder recursively for .flac audio files | # the output (a .flac audio files with relative path from ./ ) is piped to while read FILE; do FILENAME="${FILE%.*}"; flac -cd "$FILE" | lame -b 192 - "${FILENAME}.mp3"; done # for each line on the list: # FILE gets the file with .flac extension and relative path # FILENAME gets FILE without the .flac extension # run flac for that FILE with output piped to lame conversion to mp3 using 192Kb bitrate Show Sample Output


    8
    find . -type f -iname '*.flac' | while read FILE; do FILENAME="${FILE%.*}"; flac -cd "$FILE" | lame -b 192 - "${FILENAME}.mp3"; done
    paulochf · 2010-08-15 19:02:19 0
  • Prepends all directory items with "prependtext"


    -4
    ls | while read -r FILE; do mv -v "$FILE" `echo "prependtext$FILE" `; done
    IgnitionWeb · 2010-08-14 14:19:18 0
  • all files in the directory get moved, in doing so the new name of the file is the original name with out spaces (using translate command)


    -3
    ls | while read -r FILE; do mv -v "$FILE" `echo $FILE | tr -d ' '`; done
    IgnitionWeb · 2010-08-14 14:10:48 0
  • This is a command template for achiving the following: * loop over files --> find -name "" | while read file; do ...; done * output progress --> echo -n . * execute some command on each file and save output for later usage --> output=$() * if command failed, open subshell and echo newline --> || (echo;...;...;) * echo output of command --> echo "$output" Show Sample Output


    2
    find <dir> -name "<pattern>" | while read file; do echo -n .; output=$(<command>) || (echo ; echo $file:; echo "$output"; ); done
    Marco · 2010-08-10 11:45:31 0
  • Replace the echo command with whatever commands you want. 'read' reads a line from stdin and places the text in the variable, the stdin of the while loop comes from the find command. Note that with simple commands, an easier way is using the '-exec' option of find. My command is useful if you want to execute multiple commands in the loop. Show Sample Output


    0
    find -name 'foo*' | while read i; do echo "$i"; done
    imgx64 · 2010-07-16 15:35:27 3
  • Thanks th John_W for suggesting the fix allowing ~/ to be used when saving a directory. directions: Type in a url, it will show a preview of what the file will look like when saved, then asks if you want to save the preview and where you want to save it. Great for grabbing the latest commandlinefu commands without a full web browser or even a GUI. Requires: w3m Show Sample Output


    0
    read -p "enter url:" a ; w3m -dump $a > /dev/shm/e1q ; less /dev/shm/e1q ; read -p "save file as text (y/n)?" b ; if [ $b = "y" ] ; then read -p "enter path with filename:" c && touch $(eval echo "$c") ; mv /dev/shm/e1q $(eval echo "$c") ; fi ; echo DONE
    LinuxMan · 2010-07-13 22:36:38 2

  • -5
    while read col1 col23; do echo $col1; done < three-column.txt > first-column.txt
    infinull · 2010-07-09 03:59:20 0
  • The above is an example of grabbing only the first column. You can define the start and end points specifically by chacater position using the following command: while read l; do echo ${l:10:40}; done < three-column-list.txt > column-c10-c40.txt Of course, it doesn't have to be a column, or extraction, it can be replacement while read l; do echo ${l/foo/bar}; done < list-with-foo.txt > list-with-bar.txt Read more about parameter expansion here: http://wiki.bash-hackers.org/syntax/pe Think of this as an alternative to awk or sed for file operations


    1
    while read l; do echo ${l%% *}; done < three-column-list.txt > only-first-column.txt
    zed · 2010-07-09 03:42:56 0
  • This will save your open windows to a file (~/.windows). To start those applications: cat ~/.windows | while read line; do $line &; done Should work on any EWMH/NetWM compatible X Window Manager. If you use DWM or another Window Manager not using EWMH or NetWM try this: xwininfo -root -children | grep '^ ' | grep -v children | grep -v '<unknown>' | sed -n 's/^ *\(0x[0-9a-f]*\) .*/\1/p' | uniq | while read line; do xprop -id $line _NET_WM_PID | sed -n 's/.* = \([0-9]*\)$/\1/p'; done | uniq -u | grep -v '^$' | while read line; do ps -o cmd= $line; done > ~/.windows Show Sample Output


    5
    wmctrl -l -p | while read line; do ps -o cmd= "$(echo "$line" | awk '$0=$3')"; done > ~/.windows
    matthewbauer · 2010-07-04 22:11:24 2
  • Revised approach to and3k's version, using pipes and read rather than command substitution. This does not require fiddling with IFS when paths have whitespace, and does not risk hitting command-line size limits. It's less verbose on the missing files, but it stops iterating at the first file that's missing, so it should be definitely faster. I expanded all the qlist options to be more self-describing.


    3
    emerge -av1 `qlist --installed --nocolor | uniq | while read cp; do qlist --exact $cp | while read file; do test -e $file || { echo $cp; echo "$cp: missing $file (and maybe more)" 1>&2; break; }; done; done`
    Flameeyes · 2010-07-04 19:55:42 2
  • This shows every bit of information that stat can get for any file, dir, fifo, etc. It's great because it also shows the format and explains it for each format option. If you just want stat help, create this handy alias 'stath' to display all format options with explanations. alias stath="stat --h|sed '/Th/,/NO/!d;/%/!d'" To display on 2 lines: ( F=/etc/screenrc N=c IFS=$'\n'; for L in $(sed 's/%Z./%Z\n/'<<<`stat --h|sed -n '/^ *%/s/^ *%\(.\).*$/\1:%\1/p'`); do G=$(echo "stat -$N '$L' \"$F\""); eval $G; N=fc;done; ) For a similarly powerful stat-like function optimized for pretty output (and can sort by any field), check out the "lll" function http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/5815/advanced-ls-output-using-find-for-formattedsortable-file-stat-info From my .bash_profile -> http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html Show Sample Output


    3
    statt(){ C=c;stat --h|sed '/Th/,/NO/!d;/%/!d'|while read l;do p=${l/% */};[ $p == %Z ]&&C=fc&&echo ^FS:^;echo "`stat -$C $p \"$1\"` ^$p^${l#%* }";done|column -ts^; }
    AskApache · 2010-06-11 23:31:03 0
  • This provides a way to sort output based on the length of the line, so that shorter lines appear before longer lines. It's an addon to the sort that I've wanted for years, sometimes it's very useful. Taken from my http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html Show Sample Output


    2
    sortwc () { local L;while read -r L;do builtin printf "${#L}@%s\n" "$L";done|sort -n|sed -u 's/^[^@]*@//'; }
    AskApache · 2010-05-20 20:13:52 1
  • Plays the mp3 stream of The Current as a background job. When you are done run: fg %1 then to exit Quite possible with Growl for mac I'd guess, although have not tried. Libnotify needed for notification, stream will still work otherwise


    7
    mplayer http://minnesota.publicradio.org/tools/play/streams/the_current.pls < /dev/null | grep --line-buffered "StreamTitle='.*S" -o | grep --line-buffered "'.*'" -o > mus & tail -n0 -f mus | while read line; do notify-send "Music Change" "$line";done
    spiffwalker · 2010-05-09 17:51:40 0
  • Some servers don't have ssh-copy-id, this works in those cases. It will ask for the destination server, this can be IP, hostname, or user@hostname if different from current user. Ssh keygen will let you know if a pubkey already exists on your system and you can opt to not overwrite it.


    -2
    echo 'Host or User@Host?:'; read newserver && ssh-keygen -N "" -t rsa -f ~/.ssh/id_rsa ; ssh $newserver cat <~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub ">>" ~/.ssh/authorized_keys ; ssh $newserver
    alf · 2010-05-07 06:24:53 1
  • in "a.html", find all images referred as relative URI in an HTML file by "src" attribute of "img" element, replace them with "data:" URI. This useful to create single HTML file holding all images in it, as a replacement of the IE-created .mht file format. The generated HTML works fine on every other browser except IE, as well as many HTML editors like kompozer, while the .mht format only works for IE, but not for every other browser. Compare to the KDE's own single-file-web-page format "war" format, which only opens correctly on KDE, the HTML file with "data:" URI is more universally supported. The above command have many bugs. My commandline-fu is too limited to fix them: 1. it assume all URLs are relative URIs, thus works in this case: <img src="images/logo.png"/> but does not work in this case: <img src="http://www.my_web_site.com/images/logo.png" /> This may not be a bug, as full URIs perhaps should be ignored in many use cases. 2. it only work for images whoes file name suffix is one of .jpg, .gif, .png, albeit images with .jpeg suffix and those without extension names at all are legal to HTML. 3. image file name is not allowed to contain "(" even though frequently used, as in "(copy of) my car.jpg". Besides, neither single nor double quotes are allowed. 4. There is infact a big flaw in this, file names are actually used as regular expression to be replaced with base64 encoded content. This cause the script to fail in many other cases. Example: 'D:\images\logo.png', where backward slash have different meaning in regular expression. I don't know how to fix this. I don't know any command that can do full text (no regular expression) replacement the way basic editors like gedit does. 5. The original a.html are not preserved, so a user should make a copy first in case things go wrong.


    4
    grep -ioE "(url\(|src=)['\"]?[^)'\"]*" a.html | grep -ioE "[^\"'(]*.(jpg|png|gif)" | while read l ; do sed -i "s>$l>data:image/${l/[^.]*./};base64,`openssl enc -base64 -in $l| tr -d '\n'`>" a.html ; done;
    zhangweiwu · 2010-05-05 14:07:51 2
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