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Wait for file to stop changing
This loop will finish if a file hasn't changed in the last 10 seconds. . It checks the file's modification timestamp against the clock. If 10 seconds have elapsed without any change to the file, then the loop ends. . This script will give a false positive if there's a 10 second delay between updates, e.g. due to network congestion . How does it work? 'date +%s' gives the current time in seconds 'stat -c %Y' gives the file's last modification time in seconds '$(( ))' is bash's way of doing maths '[ X -lt 10 ]' tests the result is Less Than 10 otherwise sleep for 1 second and repeat . Note: Clever as this script is, inotify is smarter.

Email yourself after a job is done
This is a two part command that comes in really handy if you're running commands that take longer than you're willing to wait. The commands are separated by the semicolon(;) The first command is whatever you're attempting to do. The second commands emails you after the job completes.

Regex to remove HTML-Tags from a file
This regular expression removes all HTML-Tags from the file.

converts a directory full of source tarballs into a bzr repository so you can compare different versions easily

Typing the current date ( or any string ) via a shortcut as if the keys had been actually typed with the hardware keyboard in any application.
That works in all softs, CLI or GUI... I don't want to waste time to all the time typing the same stuff . So, I have that command in my window manager shortcuts ( meta+l ). All the window managers have editable shortcuts AFAIK. If not, or you don't want to use it that way, you can easily use the xbindkeys soft. I you're using kde4, you can run : $ systemsettings then open "inputs actions" and create a new shortcut. For Gnome take a look there : http://www.cyberciti.biz/faq/howto-create-keyboard-shortcuts-in-gnome/ A more advanced one, with strings and newlines : $ xvkbd -xsendevent -text "---8

Sum file sizes
Even simpler! Use du ... the -s and -c flags summarize and print a grand total of all files recursively. The -b flag prints in byte format. You can use the -h flag instead to print in human readable format.

Create a backup of the file.
It will create a backup of the filename. The advantage is that if you list the folder the backups will be sorted by date. The command works on any unix in bash.

Monitor connection statistics with netstat and watch

Show numerical values for each of the 256 colors in bash
Same as http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/5876, but for bash. This will show a numerical value for each of the 256 colors in bash. Everything in the command is a bash builtin, so it should run on any platform where bash is installed. Prints one color per line. If someone is interested in formatting the output, paste the alternative.

Create a bash script from last commands
In order to write bash-scripts, I often do the task manually to see how it works. I type ### at the start of my session. The function fetches the commands from the last occurrence of '###', excluding the function call. You could prefix this with a here-document to have a proper script-header. Delete some lines, add a few variables and a loop, and you're ready to go. This function could probably be much shorter...


Stay in the loop…

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