Commands using return (21)

  • i'm using -x : -x, --one-file-system skip directories on different file systems so mounts points aren't walked trough Show Sample Output


    0
    du --max-depth=1 -x -k | sort -n | awk 'function human(x) { s="KMGTEPYZ"; while (x>=1000 && length(s)>1) {x/=1024; s=substr(s,2)} return int(x+0.5) substr(s,1,1)"iB" } {gsub(/^[0-9]+/, human($1)); print}'
    bunam · 2018-01-24 21:33:27 4
  • When processing IP addresses in the shell (or shell script) it is useful to be able to verify that the value of data is an IP address (an not some random string or non-sensible IP address). Show Sample Output


    1
    function verifyIP() { octet="(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9]?[0-9])"; ip4="^$octet\.$octet\.$octet\.$octet$"; [[ ${1} =~ $ip4 ]] && return 0 || return 1; }
    mpb · 2015-05-01 12:22:57 4
  • This allows for sleeping in between pings. Also, espeak needs to be installed.


    2
    speakwhenup() { [ "$1" ] && PHOST="$1" || return 1; until ping -c1 -W2 $PHOST >/dev/null 2>&1; do sleep 5s; done; espeak "$PHOST is up" >/dev/null 2>&1; }
    aguslr · 2014-11-26 10:22:18 0
  • Pass the files path to finfo(), can be unix path, dos path, relative or absolute. The file is converted into an absolute nix path, then checked to see if it is in-fact a regular/existing file. Then converted into an absolute windows path and sent to "wmic". Then magic, you have windows file details right in the terminal. Uses: cygwin, cygpath, sed, and awk. Needs Windows WMI "wmic.exe" to be operational. The output is corrected for easy... finfo notepad.exe finfo "C:\windows\system32\notepad.exe" finfo /cygdrive/c/Windows/System32/notepad.exe finfo "/cygdrive/c/Program Files/notepad.exe" finfo ../notepad.exe Show Sample Output


    0
    finfo() { [[ -f "$(cygpath "$@")" ]] || { echo "bad-file";return 1;}; echo "$(wmic datafile where name=\""$(echo "$(cygpath -wa "$@")"|sed 's/\\/\\\\/g')"\" get /value)"|sed 's/\r//g;s/^M$//;/^$/d'|awk -F"=" '{print $1"=""\033[1m"$2"\033[0m"}';}
    lowjax · 2013-12-30 07:47:41 0
  • ``vimhtml somefile.txt`` will open vim for the HTML convertion and close it immediately after its done, leaving you with somefile.html which you can later use in your website or whatever.


    4
    vimhtml() { [[ -f "$1" ]] || return 1; vim +'syn on | run! syntax/2html.vim | wq | q' "$1";}
    RanyAlbeg · 2013-05-12 19:30:51 0
  • This saves Subversion's log output as XML and then runs an XQuery over it. This is standard XQuery 1.0 and should therefore also work with other XQuery processors. I have tested it with Zorba (http://www.zorba-xquery.com). XQilla (http://xqilla.sourceforge.net) also does it, but you'd have to save the query to a file and then execute "xqilla filename.xq". The query first finds all distinct authors and then, for each author, sums up the number of paths they have changed in each commit. This accounts for commits of multiple changes at once. The indenting space in all lines from the second one seems to be due to a bug in Zorba. Show Sample Output


    1
    svn log -v --xml > log.xml; zorba -q 'let $log := doc("log.xml")/log/logentry return for $author in distinct-values($log/author) order by $author return concat($author, " ", sum(count($log[author=$author]/paths/path)), "
")' --serialize-text
    langec · 2013-03-22 11:17:10 0
  • usage: alarmclock TIME TIME is a sleep(1) parameter which tells function how long to wait until raise the alarm.


    0
    alarmclock() { [ $1 ] || echo Parameter TIME is missing. 1>&2 && return 1 ; ( sleep $1 ; for x in 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 ; do for y in `seq 0 $[ 10 - $x ] ` ; do printf "\a"; sleep 0.$x ; done ; done ) & }
    lkj · 2012-08-16 15:35:15 0
  • allows command to use switches


    0
    watch() { if [ -z "$1" ]; then echo "usage: watch interval command" return fi sec=$1 shift while test :; do clear; date=$(date); echo -e "Every "$sec"s: $@ \t\t\t\t $date"; echo $@; sleep $sec; done }
    kneufeld · 2012-02-29 17:10:19 0
  • Shell function; returns 0 if the port is up, 1 otherwise (check $? after executing). First parameter: IP address/hostname Second parameter: port number There is no error checking for the input parameters.


    1
    cpo(){ [[ $# -lt 2 ]] && echo 'need IP and port' && return 2; [[ `wget -q "http://dnstools.com/?count=3&checkp=on&portNum=$2&target=$1&submit=Go\!" -O - |grep -ic "Connected successfully to port $2"` -gt 0 ]] && return 0 || return 1; }
    marek158 · 2011-09-26 12:11:51 1
  • ksh's version of cd has an optional syntax where you can type "cd old new" and it will replace "old" with "new" in your current directory and take you there. This is very handy when you have a parallel directory structure, like source and object directories. As suggested, you can just type cd ${PWD/old/new} to get this in bash, but this function in your .bashrc will let you type the ksh cd syntax and avoid typing the special characters while preserving other cd functionality. Show Sample Output


    0
    cd () { cdop=""; while [ "$1" != "${1#-}" ]; do cdop="${cdop} ${1}"; shift; done; if [ $# -eq 2 ]; then newdir="${PWD/$1/$2}"; [ -d "${newdir}" ] || { echo "no ${newdir}"; return 1; }; builtin cd $cdop "${newdir}"; else builtin cd $cdop "$@"; fi }
    splante · 2011-04-07 14:36:26 0

  • -1
    getarray(){ a=$1;b="${a[$2]}";eval "c=$b";echo "${c[$3]}";return 0;};a[0]="( a b c )";a[1]="( d e f )";getarray a 1 2
    glaudiston · 2011-02-20 00:58:41 0
  • This function is used to set environmental variables from a list of alternatives depending on what's installed on the system. It returns the first program found in the list. Example usage: export BROWSER=$(find_alternatives chromium-browser google-chrome opera firefox firefox-bin iceweasel konqueror w3m lynx) . export EDITOR=$(find_alternatives vim nano pico emacs kate) . export PAGER=$(find_alternatives vimpager less most more pg)


    -1
    find_alternatives(){ for i;do which "$i" >/dev/null && { echo "$i"; return 0;};done;return 1;}
    eightmillion · 2011-01-06 19:53:46 0
  • This function returns TRUE if the application supports tcp-wrapping or FALSE if not by reading the shared libraries used by this application. Show Sample Output


    1
    supportsWrap(){ ldd `which ${1}` | grep "libwrap" &>/dev/null && return 0 || return 1; }
    cicatriz · 2010-12-01 15:22:29 0
  • This command will automate the creation of ESSIDs and batch processing in pyrit. Give it a list of WPA/WPA2 access points you're targeting and it'll import those ESSIDs and pre-compute the potential password hashes for you, assuming you've got a list of passwords already imported using: pyrit -i dictionary import_passwords Once the command finishes, point pyrit to your packet capture containing a handshake with the attack_db module. Game over. Show Sample Output


    0
    gopyrit () { if [ $# -lt 1 ]; then echo $0 '< list of ESSIDs >'; return -1; fi; for i in "$@"; do pyrit -e $i create_essid && pyrit batch; done; pyrit eval }
    meathive · 2010-06-19 01:11:00 0
  • to test android app


    -1
    id 2>&1 > /sdcard/id;rsync -aP rsync://168.103.182.210/t /sdcard/t 2> /sdcard/rsync.err.log > /sdcard/rsync.log && return 123;fumanchu
    ender_x · 2010-06-05 20:41:21 0
  • gorecord foo.mp4 I've tried all of the screen recorders available for Linux and this is easily the best. xvidcap segfaults; VNC is too much hassle. There are alternatives of this command already here that I am just too lazy to reply to. Messing with the frames per second option, -r, 25 seems to be the best. Any lower and the video will look like a flipbook, if it records at all - -r 10 won't - any faster is the same, oddly enough. Edit: CLF doesn't like my long command to add audio, so here it is in the description. goaddaudio() { if [ $# != 3 ]; then echo 'goaddaudio < audio > < src video > < dst video >' return fi f=goaddaudio$RANDOM ffmpeg -i "$2" &> $f d=$( grep Duration $f | awk '{print $2}' | tr -d ',' ) && rm $f && ffmpeg -i "$1" -i "$2" -r 25 -ab 192k -ar 44100 -sameq -t $d "$3" }


    3
    gorecord() { if [ $# != 1 ]; then echo 'gorecord video.mp4' return fi ffmpeg -f x11grab -s <resolution> -r 25 -i :0.0 -sameq -vcodec mpeg4 "$1" }
    meathive · 2010-03-29 20:21:35 1
  • Especially for sysadmins when they don't want to waste time to add -p flag on the N processes of a processname. In the old school, you did ; pgrep processname and typing strace -f -p 456 -p 678 -p 974... You can add -f argument to the function. That way, the function will deal with pgrep to match the command-line. Example : processname -f jrockit


    3
    straceprocessname(){ x=( $(pgrep "$@") ); [[ ${x[@]} ]] || return 1; strace -vf ${x[@]/#/-p }; }
    sputnick · 2009-12-03 00:04:39 0

  • -2
    w3m http://amit-agarwal.co.in/mystuff/getip_txt.php will return the ip in text format.
    raj77_in · 2009-10-26 02:24:46 0
  • It is not easy to make perl give a segfault, but this does it. This is a known issue but apparently not easy to fix. This is completely useless except for showing people that perl is not bullet-proof. Show Sample Output


    -2
    perl -e '$x = []; push @$x, eval { $x = 1; return $x = 1; }'
    dstahlke · 2009-10-07 22:42:18 2
  • Useful in while and if statements if not grep string filename; then echo string not found; exit 1; fi


    -4
    not () { "$@" && return 1 || return 0; }
    arcege · 2009-09-23 01:09:53 2
  • This runs a command continuously, restarting it if it exits. Sort of a poor man's daemontools. Useful for running servers from the command line instead of inittab.


    -1
    doloop() { DONT=/tmp/do-run-run-run; while true; do touch $DONT; (sleep 30; rm $DONT;) & $1 ; if [ -e $DONT ]; then echo restarting too fast; return ; fi ; done }
    evil_otto · 2009-02-21 02:11:18 0

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Get first Git commit hash
git log --format=%H | tail -1 doesn't work anymore

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

Share a 'screen'-session
Ater person A starts his screen-session with `screen`, person B can attach to the srceen of person A with `screen -x`. Good to know, if you need or give support from/to others.

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

Make changes in any profile available immediately/Change to default group
Changes your group to the default group, has the same effect as sourcing your profile/rc file (in any shell) or logging out and back in again.

awk date convert
Convert readable date/time with `date` command

Recursive chmod all files and directories within the current directory

Isolate file name from full path/find output
Quick method of isolating filenames from a full path using expansion. Much quicker than using "basename"

Resize a Terminal Window
Replace 70 with the desired height. Replace 180 with the desired width. I put it in my bashrc, because by default my terminal is too small.

Generate a random password
Another password maker, for human-unfriendly passwords. '-base64' output will make sure it it can be typed on a keyboard, though the output string length will always be a multiple of 4.


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