Commands using rm (272)

  • This function is used to sort selected lines of a text file to the end of that file. Especially useful in cases where human intervention is necessary to sort out parts of a file. Let's say that you have a text file which contains the words rough slimy red fluff dough For whatever reason, you want to sort all words rhyming with 'tough' to the bottom of the file, and all words denoting colors to the top, while keeping the order of the rest of the file intact. '$EDITOR' will open, showing all of the lines in the given file, numbered with '0' padding. Adding a '~' to the beginning of the line will cause the line to sort to the end of the file, adding '!' will cause it to sort to the beginning. Show Sample Output


    0
    2end () ( export LC_ALL=C; nl -n rz $1 > $1.tmp; ${EDITOR:-vi} $1.tmp; sort $1.tmp | sed -r 's/^.*[0-9]+\t+//' > $1; rm $1.tmp; )
    bartonski · 2010-03-06 23:02:28 3
  • I constantly need to work on my local computer, thus I need a way to download the codeigniter user guide, this is the wget way I figured.


    -1
    wget -r --no-parent http://codeigniter.com/user_guide/ ; mv codeigniter.com/user_guide/* . ; rm -rf codeigniter.com
    jimthunderbird · 2010-03-01 02:37:26 0
  • Assuming only VIM has *~ files in your current dir. If you have usefull data in a file named in the *~ pattern, DO NOT RUN this command!


    -5
    find . -name "*~" -exec rm {} \;
    ivanatora · 2010-02-26 10:54:02 4
  • man find: If no paths are given, the current directory is used. - Can anybody tell me why so many people are typing the dot?


    -1
    find -type d -name ".svn" -print0 | xargs -0 rm -rf
    tuxilicious · 2010-02-25 10:16:18 1

  • 1
    find . -name .svn -exec rm -r {} +;
    nishan_n · 2010-02-23 10:24:16 1

  • -8
    ls -RAx | grep "svn:$" | sed -e "s/svn:/svn/" | xargs rm -fr
    ook · 2010-02-23 08:42:15 0
  • Recursively remove .svn directories from the current location.


    -2
    rm -rf `find . -name .svn`
    jfcalvo · 2010-02-23 08:35:06 0
  • This deals nicely with files having special characters in the file name (space ' or "). Parallel is from https://savannah.nongnu.org/projects/parallel/


    -3
    tar -zcvpf backup_`date +"%Y%m%d_%H%M%S"`.tar.gz `find <target> -atime +5 -type f` 2> /dev/null | parallel -X rm -f
    unixmonkey8046 · 2010-01-28 12:41:41 0

  • 1
    find . -maxdepth 1 -type d -exec 'mv "{}" "{}-old" && svnadmin create "{}" && svnadmin recover "{}-old" && svnadmin dump "{}-old" | svnadmin load "{}" && rm -rf "{}-old"' \;
    raspi · 2010-01-26 07:06:43 0
  • Credit goes to "eightmillion" Show Sample Output


    -5
    removedir(){ read -p "Delete the current directory $PWD ? " human;if [ "$human" = "yes" ]; then [ -z "${PWD##*/}" ] && { echo "$PWD not set" >&2;return 1;}; rm -Rf ../"${PWD##*/}"/ && cd ..; else echo "I'm watching you" | pv -qL 10; fi; }
    oshazard · 2010-01-20 08:01:21 3
  • CHANGELOG Version 1.1 removedir () { echo "You are about to delete the current directory $PWD Are you sure?"; read human; if [[ "$human" = "yes" ]]; then blah=$(echo "$PWD" | sed 's/ /\\ /g'); foo=$(basename "$blah"); rm -Rf ../$foo/ && cd ..; else echo "I'm watching you" | pv -qL 10; fi; } BUG FIX: Folders with spaces Version 1.0 removedir () { echo "You are about to delete the current directory $PWD Are you sure?"; read human; if [[ "$human" = "yes" ]]; then blah=`basename $PWD`; rm -Rf ../$blah/ && cd ..; else echo "I'm watching you" | pv -qL 10; fi; } BUG FIX: Hidden directories (.dotdirectory) Version 0.9 rmdir () { echo "You are about to delete the current directory $PWD. Are you sure?"; read human; if [[ "$human" = "yes" ]]; then blah=`basename $PWD`; rm -Rf ../$blah/ && cd ..; else echo "I'm watching you" | pv -qL 10; fi; } Removes current directory with recursive and force flags plus basic human check. When prompted type yes 1. [user@host ~]$ ls foo bar 2. [user@host ~]$ cd foo 3. [user@host foo]$ removedir 4. yes 5. rm -Rf foo/ 6. [user@host ~]$ 7. [user@host ~]$ ls bar Show Sample Output


    -2
    removedir () { echo "Deleting the current directory $PWD Are you sure?"; read human; if [[ "$human" = "yes" ]]; then blah=$(echo "$PWD" | sed 's/ /\\ /g'); foo=$(basename "$blah"); rm -Rf ../$foo/ && cd ..; else echo "I'm watching you" | pv -qL 10; fi; }
    oshazard · 2010-01-17 11:34:38 3
  • Remove everything except that file with shell tricks inside a subshell to avoid changes in the environment. help shopt


    7
    ( shopt -s extglob; rm !(<PATTERN>) )
    sputnick · 2010-01-13 16:43:15 0
  • You're a developer - but it doesn't mean you have to slum it! Why not spice up your man page lookups by using a decent PDF viewer. I use 'xpdf' - maybe you prefer acroread, whatever, it's just as fast as plain dull ASCII on today's machines and you can still search for stuff - that's the main reason I use PDF and not PS.


    1
    vman(){ T=/tmp/$$.pdf;man -t $1 |ps2pdf - >$T; xpdf $T; rm -f $T; }
    bhepple · 2010-01-07 01:15:38 2
  • Convert all PNG images in directory to JPEG using ImageMagick, and delete the old PNG images.


    1
    for i in *.png; do convert "$i" "${i%.png}.jpg" && rm "$i" && echo "$i is converted."; done
    auriza · 2010-01-02 16:26:13 1

  • 3
    find /path/to/dir/ -type f -exec rm {} +
    cfajohnson · 2009-12-10 04:44:44 1
  • This uses mpg123 to convert the files to wav before burning, but you can use mplayer or mencoder or ffmpeg or lame with the --decode option, or whatever you like.


    3
    alias burnaudiocd='mkdir ./temp && for i in *.[Mm][Pp]3;do mpg123 -w "./temp/${i%%.*}.wav" "$i";done;cdrecord -pad ./temp/* && rm -r ./temp'
    eightmillion · 2009-11-21 19:57:18 0
  • remove files with access time older than a given date. If you want to remove files with a given modification time replace %A@ with %T@. Use %C@ for the modification time. The time is expressed in epoc but is easy to use any other format. Show Sample Output


    -2
    find <dir> -printf '%p : %A@\n' | awk '{FS=" : " ; if($2 < <time in epoc> ) print $1 ;}' | xargs rm --verbose -fr ;
    angleto · 2009-11-20 16:31:58 6
  • This command creates and burns a gapless audio CD with 99 tracks. Each track is a 30 second sine wave, the first is 1 Hz, the second 2 Hz, and so on, up to 99 Hz. This is useful for testing audio systems (how low can your bass go?) and for creating the constant vibrations needed to make non-Newtonian fluids (like cornstarch and water) crawl around. Note, this temporarily creates 500MB of .cdda files in the current directory. If you don't use the "rm" at the end of the command, you can burn more disks using cdrdao write cdrdao.toc Prerequisites: a blank CD-R in /dev/cdrw, sox (http://sox.sourceforge.net/), and cdrdao (http://cdrdao.sourceforge.net/). I'm also assuming a recent version of bash for the brace expansion (which just looks nicer than using seq(1), but isn't necessary). Show Sample Output


    23
    (echo CD_DA; for f in {01..99}; do echo "$f Hz">&2; sox -nt cdda -r44100 -c2 $f.cdda synth 30 sine $f; echo TRACK AUDIO; echo FILE \"$f.cdda\" 0; done) > cdrdao.toc && cdrdao write cdrdao.toc && rm ??.cdda cdrdao.toc
    hackerb9 · 2009-11-17 06:23:42 3

  • 0
    find . -size 0 -exec rm '{}' \;
    xrm0 · 2009-10-29 14:59:44 4

  • 5
    mysqldump -uUSERNAME -pPASSWORD database | gzip > /path/to/db/files/db-backup-`date +%Y-%m-%d`.sql.gz ;find /path/to/db/files/* -mtime +5 -exec rm {} \;
    nadavkav · 2009-10-28 19:49:39 1
  • Note the space before the command; that prevents your history eliminating command from being recorded. ' history -c && rm -f ~/.bash_history' Both steps are needed. 'history -c' clears what you see in the history command. 'rm -f ~/.bash_history' deletes the history file in your home directory.


    2
    history -c && rm -f ~/.bash_history
    unixmonkey6650 · 2009-10-16 13:48:20 1
  • For all of the jpgs in a directory, determine their size and if below a threshold remove them forcefully.


    0
    for i in ~/Desktop/Personal/Wallpapers/*.jpg ; { size=$((`identify -format "%wx%h" $i | sed 's/x/*/'`)) ; if [[ $size -lt 800001 ]] then ; rm -f "$i" ; fi; }
    cbrinker · 2009-10-16 00:21:21 0
  • plays with bash arrays. instead of storing the list of files in a temp file, this stores the list in ram, retrieves the last element in the array (the last html file), then removes it.


    -3
    a=($(ls *html)) && a=${a[$(expr ${#a[@]} - 1)]} && rm $a
    linuxrawkstar · 2009-10-12 16:40:06 2
  • Converts a .vdi file to a .vmdk file for use in a vmware virtual machine. The benefit: using this method actually works. There are others out there that claim to give you a working .vmdk by simply using the qemu-img command alone. Doing that only results in pain for you because the .vmdk file will be created with no errors, but it won't boot either. Be advised that these conversions are very disk-intensive by nature; you are probably dealing with disk images several gigabytes in size. Once finished, the process of using the new .vmdk file is left as an exercise to the reader. Show Sample Output


    9
    VBoxManage internalcommands converttoraw winxp.vdi winxp.raw && qemu-img convert -O vmdk winxp.raw winxp.vmdk && rm winxp.raw
    linuxrawkstar · 2009-10-12 16:23:37 0
  • Some malicious program appends a iframe or script tag to you web pages on some server, use this command to clean them in batch.


    -1
    for f in *.html; do head -n -1 $f > temp; cat temp > $f; rm temp; done
    Sunng · 2009-10-12 12:49:18 1
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