Commands using rpm (53)

  • Find out which RPMs were installed on a particular date. These would (naturally) include update RPMs. This example shows searching for "Thu 05 Mar" (with grep). Alternatively, pipe it to less so you can search inside less (with less's neat text highlighting of the search term): rpm -qa --queryformat '%{installtime} \"%{vendor}\" %{name}-%{version}-%{release} %{installtime:date}\n' | less # (this example) search term: Thu 05 Mar Show Sample Output


    4
    rpm -qa --queryformat '%{installtime} \"%{vendor}\" %{name}-%{version}-%{release} %{installtime:date}\n' | grep "Thu 05 Mar"
    mpb · 2009-03-17 13:38:20 1
  • Replace 'more' command with any command which is in your PATH. Show Sample Output


    3
    rpm -qif `which more`
    alcik · 2009-02-27 08:59:07 2

  • 3
    rpm -q -a --qf '%10{SIZE}\t%{NAME}\n' | sort -k1,1n
    octopus · 2010-04-19 07:44:49 1
  • This command could seem pretty pointless especially when you can get the same result more easily using the rpm builtin queryformat, like: rpm -qa --qf "%{NAME} %{VERSION} %{RELEASE}.%{ARCH}\n" | sort | column -t but nonetheless I've learned that sometimes it can be quite interesting trying to explore alternative ways to accomplish the same task (as Perl folks like to say: There's more than one way to do it!) Show Sample Output


    3
    rpm -qa | sed 's/^\(.*\)-\([^-]\{1,\}\)-\([^-]\{1,\}\)$/\1 \2 \3/' | sort | column -t
    acavagni · 2019-03-14 21:11:45 0
  • the newest rpms are at the top; individual packages can also be queried this way: rpm --last -q package


    2
    rpm -qa --last
    systemj · 2009-02-05 16:00:56 1
  • You can use wildcard with rpm search but you have to do 2 things: 1. use "-a" switch (means "all") with query ("-q") switch - argument is a pattern to use while searching for package names of all installed packages 2. protect wildcards, so that shell could not eat them - escape it with backslash ("\") or enclose all pattern between apostrophes ("'"): rpm -qa 'co*de' As you can see above it is possible to insert wildcards into middle of the pattern. If you want, you can add "-i" or another rpm query options, "-i" will print package information for all installed packages matching pattern. Show Sample Output


    2
    rpm -qa \*code\*
    alcik · 2009-03-11 21:16:23 1
  • Low on disk space? Check the largest installed RPMs for delete canditates. Show Sample Output


    2
    rpm -qa --qf '%{SIZE} %{NAME}\n' | sort -nr | nl | head -6 # six largest RPMs
    mpb · 2009-03-15 22:18:17 0
  • Lists all installed RPM packages with name and architecture, which is useful to check for compability packages (+ required i386 packages) on a 64bit system. Show Sample Output


    2
    rpm -qa --queryformat "%{NAME} %{ARCH}\n"
    angrox · 2009-03-18 15:19:21 0
  • In this case, I'm getting the package version for 'redhat-release', but of course, this can be applied to any package installed on the filesystem. This is very handy in scripts that need to determine just the version of the package, without the package name and all the sed and grep hackery to get to the data you want. To find out all the support format strings that 'rpm --qf' supports: rpm --querytags Show Sample Output


    2
    rpm -q --qf "%{VERSION}\n" redhat-release
    atoponce · 2009-03-25 16:46:14 1
  • It's all said in the title. Show Sample Output


    2
    rpm -qa --qf "%-10{SIZE} %-30{NAME}\n" | sort -nr | less
    betsubetsu · 2010-04-14 07:28:41 0

  • 2
    rpm -qa --qf "%-30{NAME} %-10{SIZE}\n" | sort -n | less
    betsubetsu · 2010-04-14 07:30:37 0

  • 2
    rpm -qp --scripts package.rpm
    gerard · 2011-01-04 14:38:14 2
  • For Linux distributions using rpm (eg Mandriva), this command will find the rpm package name that provides a file. Show Sample Output


    2
    rpm -q --whatprovides $filename
    mpb · 2011-02-09 23:28:15 0
  • Many times I give the same commands in loop to find informations about a file. I use this as an alias to summarize that informations in a single command. Now with variables! :D Show Sample Output


    2
    fileinfo() { RPMQF=$(rpm -qf $1); RPMQL=$(rpm -ql $RPMQF);echo "man page:";whatis $(basename $1); echo "Services:"; echo -e "$RPMQL\n"|grep -P "\.service";echo "Config files:";rpm -qc $RPMQF;echo "Provided by:" $RPMQF; }
    nnsense · 2015-05-11 16:46:01 3
  • If somehow if you get more than 1 same name rpm package install, then it cannot be removed by using simple rpm -e as it gives you more than one rpm matches error. The --matches will help to remove all the same name rpm packages.


    1
    rpm -e --allmatches filename.rpm
    sohaileo · 2009-02-12 23:09:24 1
  • This command is very helpful when we need to duplicate a test scenario and first we want to find out the installed libraries together with the version and release numbers and architecture. (look example) Command can be tuned by choosing just the names of libraries we are interested in. For example glibc and gcc. Show Sample Output


    1
    rpm -qa --qf '%{name}-%{version}-%{release}.%{arch}\n'|egrep 'compat|glibc|gcc|libst|binu'|sort
    ovalerio · 2009-02-23 10:17:47 0
  • rpm, sometimes, is not wildcard friendly. To search files installed from package this could be useful. change PACKAGENAME to any package do you want to search Show Sample Output


    1
    rpm -qa | grep PACKAGENAME | xargs rpm -q --filesbypkg
    piscue · 2009-02-26 14:32:12 0
  • On Fedora clean the boot directory; erase older kernel


    1
    rpm -q kernel-2* | grep -v $(uname -r) | xargs yum erase -y
    Nick · 2009-03-28 21:41:15 1

  • 1
    yum clean all ; rpm -Uvh http://download.fedora.redhat.com/pub/fedora/linux/releases/11/Fedora/i386/os/Packages/fedora-release-11-1.noarch.rpm ; yum -y upgrade ; reboot
    freeman · 2009-08-01 21:00:43 2
  • if you want to see all information about a package use: rpm -qi pkgname full list of querytags can be accessed by the command: rpm --querytags you can also customize the query format how ever you like with using more querytags together along with escape sequences in "man printf"! you can also use more than one package name. for example this command shows name and version in to columns: rpm -q --queryformat %-30{NAME}%{VERSION}\\n pkg1 pkg2 Show Sample Output


    1
    rpm -q --queryformat %{VERSION}\\n pkgname
    mrwill · 2010-06-03 01:54:17 0
  • Description is moved to "Sample output" because the html sanitizer for commandlinefu breaks the examples.. Show Sample Output


    1
    diff rpm_output_from_other_computer <(rpm -qa|sort)
    xeor · 2011-06-25 11:45:15 0
  • This should be an option to rpm, but isn't. I wind up using it a lot because I always forget the full name of the packages I want to delete.


    1
    sudo rpm -e `rpm -qa | grep keyword`
    mstock · 2012-10-22 16:06:39 0
  • \n Separates out the architectures on different lines. Show Sample Output


    1
    rpm -q --queryformat="%{NAME}: %{OPTFLAGS}\n" <rpm>
    robinsonaarond · 2012-12-05 22:18:03 0
  • Interesting to see which packages are larger than the kernel package. Useful to understand which RPMs might be candidates to remove if drive space is restricted. Show Sample Output


    1
    rpm -qa --queryformat '%{size} %{name}-%{version}-%{release}\n' | sort -k 1,1 -rn | nl | head -16
    mpb · 2013-03-19 21:10:54 0
  • I use this as an alias to get all .service files related a single installed file/conf (if it has services, of course). For rpm based systems ;) Show Sample Output


    1
    qf2s() { rpm -ql $(rpm -qf $1)|grep -P "\.service"; }
    nnsense · 2015-05-11 16:32:16 0
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Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Convert CSV to JSON - Python3 and Bash function
Based / Inspired by malathion's below command http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/20528/convert-csv-to-json Is written for python3 and is very easy to use csv2json *csv will convert all files ending in csv to json eg csv2json file.csv will output a file to file.json Validity of json tested in python3 and below site https://jsonformatter.curiousconcept.com/

Do a search-and-replace in a file after making a backup

True Random Dice Roll
/dev/urandom is cryptographically secure, and indistinguishable from true random, as it gathers data from external sources, influenced by human timing interactions with computers, to fill the entropy pool, and hashes the input with SHA-1. As such, this is a quick way to do a "true random" fair-6 dice roll. Using this method, you could easily create passphrases with Diceware http://diceware.com. Change the head(1) count to something other than 5 for more or less numbers.

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

Getting ESP and EIP addresses from running processes
'ps' let you specify the format that you want to see on the output.

lazy SQL QUERYING
alias for psql command line; works similar for Oracles sqlplus commandline interface. if you do not provide stdin you will end up in the db shell.

Run TOP in Color, split 4 ways for x seconds - the ultimate ps command. Great for init scripts
One of my favorite ways to impress newbies (and old hats) to the power of the shell, is to give them an incredibly colorful and amazing version of the top command that runs once upon login, just like running fortune on login. It's pretty sweet believe me, just add this one-liner to your ~/.bash_profile -- and of course you can set the height to be anything, from 1 line to 1000! $ G=$(stty -g);stty rows $((${LINES:-50}/2));top -n1; stty $G;unset G Doesn't take more than the below toprc file I've added below, and you get all 4 top windows showing output at the same time.. each with a different color scheme, and each showing different info. Each window would normally take up 1/4th of your screen when run like that - TOP is designed as a full screen program. But here's where you might learn something new today on this great site.. By using the stty command to change the terminals internal understanding of the size of your terminal window, you force top to also think that way as well. # save the correct settings to G var. $ G=$(stty -g) # change the number of rows to half the actual amount, or 50 otherwise $ stty rows $((${LINES:-50}/2)) # run top non-interactively for 1 second, the output stays on the screen (half at least) $ top -n1 # reset the terminal back to the correct values, and clean up after yourself $ stty $G;unset G This trick from my [ http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html bash_profile ], though the online version will be updated soon. Just think what else you could run like this! Note 1: I had to edit the toprc file out due to this site can't handle that (uploads/including code). So you can grab it from [ http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash-power-prompt.html my site ] Note 2: I had to come back and edit again because the links weren't being correctly parsed

Synchronise a file from a remote server
You will be prompted for a password unless you have your public keys set-up.

Random unsigned integer


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