Commands using rsync (88)

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Who needs pipes?
or: C

Recursively remove Mac . (dot) files
Searches from present dir forward and removes all Mac generated . (dot) files.

Retrieve "last modified" timestamp of web resource in UTC seconds
This command line assumes that "${url}" is the URL of the web resource. It can be useful to check the "freshness" of a download URL before a GET request.

listen to an offensive fortune
or replace "espeak" with "festival --tts" if you like festival better when your buddy leaves his computer unlocked use "crontab" or "at" to play at some time that would be most embarassing (during his next sales presentation) $ echo "fortune -o | espeak" | at now + 30 minutes of course you can exclude the "-o" for non offensive fortunes, or if you don't have offensive fortunes installed

list files recursively by size

Function to change prompt
Bash function to change your default prompt to something simpler and restore it to normal afterwards.

log rm commands
Sometimes, it is annoying to find your files or directories missing. If you want to log all the rm commands you can put this in /etc/profile.

Kill a process by its partial name
pkill is a standard command and kills processes Byte part of their name.

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Check a nfs mountpoint and force a remount if it does not reply after a given timeout.
Based on the execute with timeout command in this site. A more complex script: #!/bin/sh # This script will check the avaliability of a list of NFS mount point, # forcing a remount of those that do not respond in 5 seconds. # # It basically does this: # NFSPATH=/mountpoint TIMEOUT=5; perl -e "alarm $TIMEOUT; exec @ARGV" "test -d $NFSPATH" || (umount -fl $NFSPATH; mount $NFSPATH) # TIMEOUT=5 SCRIPT_NAME=$(basename $0) for i in [email protected]; do echo "Checking $i..." if ! perl -e "alarm $TIMEOUT; exec @ARGV" "test -d $i" > /dev/null 2>&1; then echo "$SCRIPT_NAME: $i is failing with retcode $?."1>&2 echo "$SCRIPT_NAME: Submmiting umount -fl $i" 1>&2 umount -fl $i; echo "$SCRIPT_NAME: Submmiting mount $i" 1>&2 mount $i; fi done


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