Commands using rsync (88)

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sort the contents of a text file in place.
sorts the contents of a file without the need for a second file to take the sorted output. This was previously entered as `sort -g list.txt -o $_` but as others have pointed out the $_ references the previous command. so this would've worked had that been the second part of a command joined with && like: cat list.txt && sort -g list.txt -o $_ The user below me Robin had the most correct command.

How to trim a video using ffmpeg
Will trim the video to 4 seconds starting from the beginning. The -vcodec , -acodec options are required so that ffmpeg knows in what video/audio format you want for the new video.

Skip over .svn directories when using the
Put the positive clauses after the '-o' option.

Embed next line on the end of current line using sed
N: On the current line, sed will display it on pattern space, plus a \n (new line); but s/\n//: Will get rid of new line displayed on pattern space, joining the current line's end with the start of the next line Useful in scripts.

Show what PID is listening on port 80 on Linux

print first n characters of any file in human readble form using hexdump
Usefull to determine unknown file type

Search google.com on your terminal
I found this command on a different site and thought you guy might enjoy it. Just change "YOURSEARCH" to what ever you want to search. Example, "Linux Commands"

Stripping ^M at end of each line for files
That "^M" is Ctrl-M, which is a carriage return, and is not needed in Unix file systems. Where ^V is actually Ctrl-V and ^M is actually Ctrl-M (you must type these yourself, don't just copy and paste this command). ^V will not be displayed on your screen.

Outputs each arg on its own line
This can be useful for transforming command-line args into input for xargs (one per line). This can also be done with ls if the args are filenames, but that's getting awfully close to Useless Use of Cat territory (http://partmaps.org/era/unix/award.html).

xargs for builtin bash commands


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