Commands using sed (1,280)

  • Use the -a flag to display all files, including hidden files. If you just want to display regular files, use a -1 (yes, that is the number one). Got this by RTFM and adding some sed magic. [bbbco@bbbco-dt ~]$ ls -a | sed "s#^#${PWD}/#" /home/bbbco/. /home/bbbco/.. /home/bbbco/2011-09-01-00-33-02.073-VirtualBox-2934.log /home/bbbco/2011-09-10-09-49-57.004-VirtualBox-2716.log /home/bbbco/.adobe /home/bbbco/.bash_history /home/bbbco/.bash_logout /home/bbbco/.bash_profile /home/bbbco/.bashrc ... [bbbco@bbbco-dt ~]$ ls -1 | sed "s#^#${PWD}/#" /home/bbbco/2011-09-01-00-33-02.073-VirtualBox-2934.log /home/bbbco/2011-09-10-09-49-57.004-VirtualBox-2716.log /home/bbbco/cookies.txt /home/bbbco/Desktop /home/bbbco/Documents /home/bbbco/Downloads ... Show Sample Output


    -9
    ls -a | sed "s#^#${PWD}/#"
    bbbco · 2011-12-16 22:19:06 2
  • Normally, if you just want to see directories you'd use brianmuckian's command 'ls -d *\', but I ran into problems trying to use that command in my script because there are often multiple directories per line. If you need to script something with directories and want to guarantee that there is only one entry per line, this is the fastest way i know Show Sample Output


    -10
    ls -l | grep ^d | sed 's:.*\ ::g'
    LinuxMan · 2011-08-06 23:52:46 4

  • -11
    /usr/bin/lynx -dump http://www.netins.net/dialup/tools/my_ip.shtml | grep -A2 "Your current IP Address is:" | tail -n1 | tr -d ' '|sed '/^$/d'| sed 's/^ *//g'
    juanmi · 2010-12-20 15:29:53 1
  • This works just like write or wall ... cept one thing the sender is anonymous ... if you really want to drive everyone insane replace echo \"The Matrix has you...\" with cat /dev/urandom nice one to do on April fool's day Show Sample Output


    -12
    w | egrep -v '(load|FROM)' | awk '{print $2}' | sed 's/^/tty/' | awk '{print "echo \"The Matrix has you...\" >> /dev/" $1}' | bash
    copremesis · 2009-04-29 22:04:56 6
  • I have this as a file called deletekey in my ~/bin. Makes life a little easier.


    -13
    echo "${1}" | egrep '^[[:digit:]]*$' ; if [ "$?" -eq 0 ] ; then sed -i "${1}"d $HOME/.ssh/known_hosts ; else printf "\tYou must enter a number!\n\n" ; exit 1 ; fi
    DaveQB · 2010-07-11 23:09:11 0
  • ‹ First  < 50 51 52

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

Recover resolution when a fullscreen program crashes and you're stuck with a tiny X resolution
This forces X back to its maximum resolution configured. To get a list, type `xrandr'.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Terminate a frozen SSH-session
A key sequence for terminating a frozen session. Full sequence on a swedish keyboard: [ENTER] [ALTGR] tilde [SPACE] dot

Delete empty directories
Recursively delete empty directories. Use with care.

Automatically download Ubuntu 10.04 when available
Tested with 9.10 release. Choose whatever torrent client you prefer.

ssh autocomplete
Autocomplete from .ssh/config

remove files and directories with acces time older than a given date
touch a dummy file with the specified date, then use find with -anewer .

git pull all repos

list with full path

Grab IP address on machine with multiple interfaces
Instead of hard-coding in a check to scrape info from ifconfig based on a specific interface, do it in a more portable way. This works really well if you switch between wired, wireless, bluetooth or even VPN connections. You can get your current IP in a script (since it'll be something like tun0 instead of eth0 or wlan1). This uses a well known public ip address 8.8.8.8, but it doesn't actually connect to it, it just shows you the route it would take.


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: