Commands using sh (68)


  • 17
    env PS4=' ${BASH_SOURCE}:${LINENO}(${FUNCNAME[0]}) ' sh -x /etc/profile
    oernii2 · 2009-10-07 14:44:59 4
  • I needed a way to search all files in a web directory that contained a certain string, and replace that string with another string. In the example, I am searching for "askapache" and replacing that string with "htaccess". I wanted this to happen as a cron job, and it was important that this happened as fast as possible while at the same time not hogging the CPU since the machine is a server. So this script uses the nice command to run the sh shell with the command, which makes the whole thing run with priority 19, meaning it won't hog CPU processing. And the -P5 option to the xargs command means it will run 5 separate grep and sed processes simultaneously, so this is much much faster than running a single grep or sed. You may want to do -P0 which is unlimited if you aren't worried about too many processes or if you don't have to deal with process killers in the bg. Also, the -m1 command to grep means stop grepping this file for matches after the first match, which also saves time. Show Sample Output


    10
    sh -c 'S=askapache R=htaccess; find . -mount -type f|xargs -P5 -iFF grep -l -m1 "$S" FF|xargs -P5 -iFF sed -i -e "s%${S}%${R}%g" FF'
    AskApache · 2009-10-02 05:03:10 0
  • This is useful if you'd like to see the output of a script while you edit it. Each time you save the file the command is executed. I thought for sure something like this already exists - and it probably does. I'm on an older system and tend to be missing some useful things. Examples: ontouchdo yourscript 'clear; yourscript somefiletoparse' Edit yourscript in a separate window and see new results each time you save. ontouchdo crufty.html 'clear; xmllint --noout crufty.html 2>&1 | head' Keep editing krufty.html until the xmllint window is empty. Note: Mac/bsd users should use stat -f%m. If you don't have stat, you can use perl -e '$f=shift; @s=stat($f); print "$s[9]\n";' $1


    10
    ontouchdo(){ while :; do a=$(stat -c%Y "$1"); [ "$b" != "$a" ] && b="$a" && sh -c "$2"; sleep 1; done }
    putnamhill · 2010-10-22 23:25:12 3

  • 7
    find . -type d -exec env d="$dest_root" sh -c ' exec mkdir -p -- "$d/$1"' '{}' '{}' \;
    hahnst · 2009-08-03 12:21:37 1
  • or echo '127.0.0.1 facebook.com' | sudo tee -a /etc/hosts Do not execute this command if you don't know what you are doing.


    7
    sudo sh -c "echo '127.0.0.1 www.facebook.com' >> /etc/hosts"
    devalnor · 2012-01-16 14:06:51 2
  • Bash process substitution which curls the website 'hashbang.sh' and executes the shell script embedded in the page. This is obviously not the most secure way to run something like this, and we will scold you if you try. The smarter way would be: Download locally over SSL > curl https://hashbang.sh >> hashbang.sh Verify integrty with GPG (If available) > gpg --recv-keys 0xD2C4C74D8FAA96F5 > gpg --verify hashbang.sh Inspect source code > less hashbang.sh Run > chmod +x hashbang.sh > ./hashbang.sh


    5
    sh <(curl hashbang.sh)
    lrvick · 2015-03-15 21:02:01 2
  • This is a commodity one-liner that uses ShellCheck to assure some quality on bash and sh scripts under a specific directory. It ignores the files in .git directory. Just substitute "./.git/*" with "./.svn/*" for older and booring centralized version control. Just substitute ShellCheck with "rm" if your scripts are crap and you want to get rid of them :)


    5
    find . -type f ! -path "./.git/*" -exec sh -c "head -n 1 {} | egrep -a 'bin/bash|bin/sh' >/dev/null" \; -print -exec shellcheck {} \;
    brx75x · 2017-03-16 08:43:56 3

  • 3
    find $MAILDIR/ -type f -printf '%T@ %p\n' | sort --reverse | sed -e '{ 1,100d; s/[0-9]*\.[0-9]* \(.*\)/\1/g }' | xargs -i sh -c "cat {}&&rm -f {}" | gzip -c >>ARCHIVE.gz
    maergil · 2009-08-11 20:12:15 0
  • this command works with one gziped file per table, and restore 4 tables in parallel. Show Sample Output


    3
    find -print0 | xargs -0 -n 1 -P 4 -I {} sh -c "zcat '{}' | mysql nix"
    skygreg · 2009-08-25 15:05:55 2
  • USAGE: $ sudor your command This command uses a dirty hack with history, so be sure you not turned it off. WARNING! This command behavior differ from other commands. It more like text macro, so you shouldn't use it in subshells, non-interactive sessions, other functions/aliases and so on. You shouldn't pipe into sudor (any string that prefixes sudor will be removed), but if you really want, use this commands: proceed_sudo () { sudor_command="`HISTTIMEFORMAT=\"\" history 1 | sed -r -e 's/^.*?sudor//' -e 's/\"/\\\"/g'`" ; pre_sudor_command="`history 1 | cut -d ' ' -f 5- | sed -r -e 's/sudor.*$//' -e 's/\"/\\\"/g'`"; if [ -n "${pre_sudor_command/ */}" ] ; then eval "${pre_sudor_command%| *}" | sudo sh -c "$sudor_command"; else sudo sh -c "$sudor_command" ;fi ;}; alias sudor="proceed_sudo # "


    3
    proceed_sudo () { sudor_command="`HISTTIMEFORMAT=\"\" history 1 | sed -r -e 's/^.*?sudor//' -e 's/\"/\\\"/g'`" ; sudo sh -c "$sudor_command"; }; alias sudor="proceed_sudo # "
    mechmind · 2010-06-29 14:56:29 0
  • Do the same as pssh, just in shell syntax. Put your hosts in hostlist, one per line. Command outputs are gathered in output and error directories.


    3
    xargs -n1 -P100 -I{} sh -c 'ssh {} uptime >output/{} 2>error/{}' <hostlist
    dooblem · 2010-08-20 11:03:11 0
  • This command converts filenames with embedded spaces in the current directory replacing spaces with the underscore ("_") character. Show Sample Output


    2
    ls -1 | grep " " | awk '{printf("mv \"%s\" ",$0); gsub(/ /,"_",$0); printf("%s\n",$0)}' | sh # rename filenames: spaces to "_"
    mpb · 2009-03-15 18:42:43 13
  • Manages everything through one sed script instead of pipes of greps and awks. Quoting of shell variables is generally easier within a sed script.


    2
    svn log fileName | sed -ne "/^r\([0-9][0-9]*\).*/{;s//\1/;s/.*/svn cat fileName@& > fileName.r&/p;}" | sh -s
    arcege · 2009-09-04 17:23:45 0
  • For each directory from the current one, list the counts of files in each of these directories. Change the -maxdepth to drill down further through directories. Show Sample Output


    2
    find . -maxdepth 1 -type d -exec sh -c "printf '{} ' ; find '{}' -type f -ls | wc -l" \;
    HerbCSO · 2013-07-29 19:46:35 0
  • url can be like any one of followings: url="MejbOFk7H6c" url="http://youtu.be/MejbOFk7H6c" url="https://youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=MejbOFk7H6c#t" url="//www.youtube.com/v/MejbOFk7H6c?hl=ru_RU&version=3&rel=0" url="http://www.youtube.com/embed/MejbOFk7H6c?feature=player_embedded" If url mismatching, whole url will be returned. Show Sample Output


    2
    sh -c 'url="http://youtu.be/MejbOFk7H6c"; vid="`for i in ".*youtu\.be/\([^\/&?#]\+\)" ".*youtu.\+v[=/]\([^\/&?#]\+\)" ".*youtu.\+embed/\([^\/&?#]\+\)"; do expr "${url}" : "${i}"; done`"; if [ -n "${vid}" ]; then echo ${vid}; else echo "${url}"; fi'
    qwertyroot · 2013-09-04 19:33:09 0
  • This has been my "sysupgrade" alias since ca. 2006, first used on Debian Sid, then Sabayon, and it still does its duty on Mint nowadays without breaking stuff.


    2
    sudo sh -c "aptitude update; aptitude -DrVWZ full-upgrade; aptitude autoclean; exit"
    lordtoran · 2015-09-28 23:48:05 0
  • Get information of volume labels of bitlocker volumes, even if they are encrypted and locked (no access to filesystem, no password provided). Note that the volume labels can have spaces, but only if you name then before encryption. Renaming a bitlocker partition after being encrypted does not have the same effect as doing it before. Show Sample Output


    2
    sudo echo "BitLocker Volume labels:" && sudo dislocker-find | xargs -I{} sh -c 'echo -n "{} ->+ " ; sudo dislocker-metadata -V {} | grep string' | sed 's/+.*string://' | sed "s/'[^ ]* /\"/g" | sed 's/\ [^ ]*$/"/'
    bugmenot · 2018-04-29 01:00:11 0
  • If the remote doesn't export its desktop (eg fluxbox, blackbox etc) then you need to run a x11vnc server there and a vncviewer at the local end. This command does the lot for you - it assumes that you can 'ssh' to the box without a password and that x11vnc is installed at the remote end.


    1
    rdp() { ssh $1 sh -c 'PATH=$PATH:/usr/local/bin; x11vnc -q -rfbauth ~/.vnc/passwd -display :0' & sleep 4; vncviewer $1:0 & }
    bhepple · 2009-11-25 07:21:02 0
  • I used this command to recursively gather all mp3 files that were previously imported into their own directories (sorted by band name) in Songbird.


    1
    find . -name '*.mp3' -type f -exec sh -c 'exec cp -f "$@" /home/user/dir' find-copy {} +
    mariusz · 2009-12-08 19:31:16 1
  • Grabs the cmdline used to execute the process, and the environment that the process is being run under. This is much different than the 'env' command, which only lists the environment for the shell. This is very useful (to me at least) to debug various processes on my server. For example, this lets me see the environment that my apache, mysqld, bind, and other server processes have. Here's a function I use: aa_ps_all () { ( cd /proc && command ps -A -opid= | xargs -I'{}' sh -c 'test $PPID -ne {}&&test -r {}/cmdline&&echo -e "\n[{}]"&&tr -s "\000" " "<{}/cmdline&&echo&&tr -s "\000\033" "\nE"<{}/environ|sort&&cat {}/limits' ); } From my .bash_profile at http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html Show Sample Output


    1
    cd /proc&&ps a -opid=|xargs -I+ sh -c '[[ $PPID -ne + ]]&&echo -e "\n[+]"&&tr -s "\000" " "<+/cmdline&&echo&&tr -s "\000\033" "\nE"<+/environ|sort'
    AskApache · 2010-10-22 02:34:33 3

  • 1
    svn status | grep '^?' | sed -e 's/^? */svn add "/g' -e 's/$/"/g'|sh ; svn status | grep '^!' | sed -e 's/^! */svn delete "/g' -e 's/$/"/g'|sh
    ironmarc · 2010-11-18 09:57:45 0

  • 1
    git branch -r | awk -F'/' '{print "git fetch "$1,$2}' | xargs -I {} sh -c {}
    cakyus · 2014-10-25 07:36:50 2
  • Linux offers an interesting option to restrict the use of dmesg. It is available via /proc/sys/kernel/dmesg_restrict. You can check the status with: cat /proc/sys/kernel/dmesg_restrict Alternatively you can use sysctl: sudo sysctl -w kernel.dmesg_restrict=1 To make your change persistent across reboot, edit a fille in /etc/sysctl.d/.


    1
    sudo sh -c 'echo 1 > /proc/sys/kernel/dmesg_restrict'
    Blacksimon · 2015-03-13 20:54:45 0
  • Benchmark a SQL query against MySQL Server. The example runs the query 10 times, and you get the average runtime in the output. To ensure that the query does not get cached, use `RESET QUERY CACHE;` on top in the query file. Show Sample Output


    1
    perf stat -r 10 sh -c "mysql > /dev/null < query.sql"
    particleflux · 2018-05-03 12:20:03 0

  • 1
    find /path -name '*.pdf' -exec sh -c 'pdftotext "{}" - | grep --with-filename --label="{}" --color "your pattern"' \;
    HaoZeke · 2018-08-13 07:31:54 0
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Remove specific versions of old kernels (Ubuntu/Debian)
If, for example, you want to remove all kernels and headers but the last three versions, you can't use one of that magic all-in-one "remove old stuff" commands. With this simple but elegant command you can remove a range of versions, or a list of versions with e.g. {14,16,20}.

Changing the terminal title to the last shell command
You can set the previous bash command as the terminal title by this command. Explanation: -trap assigns a command to execute at a given bash signal. -in the $BASH_COMMAND you find the last command -you can set the terminal title with the escape sequence: \e]0;this is the title\007 -to let the echo care about the backslashes give the -e to it Since trap is a built in bash command you find more informatin in 'man bash'for more Source: http://www.davidpashley.com/articles/xterm-titles-with-bash.html

split large video file
i have a large video file, 500+ MB, so i cant upload it to flickr, so to reduce the size i split it into 2 files. the command shows the splitting for the first file, from 0-4 minutes. ss is start time and t is duration (how long you want the output file to be). credit goes to philc: http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=480343 NOTE: when i made the second half of the video, i got a *lot* of lines like this: frame= 0 fps= 0 q=0.0 size= 0kB time=10000000000.00 bitrate= 0.0kbit just be patient, it is working =)

find previously entered commands (requires configuring .inputrc)
[Click the "show sample output" link to see how to use this keystroke.]   Meta-p is one of my all time most used and most loved features of working at the command line. It's also one that surprisingly few people know about. To use it with bash (actually in any readline application), you'll need to add a couple lines to your .inputrc then have bash reread the .inputrc using the bind command:   $ echo '"\en": history-search-forward' >> ~/.inputrc   $ echo '"\ep": history-search-backward' >> ~/.inputrc   $ bind -f ~/.inputrc     I first learned about this feature in tcsh. When I switched over to bash about fifteen years ago, I had assumed I'd prefer ^R to search in reverse. Intuitively ^R seemed better since you could search for an argument instead of a command. I think that, like using a microkernel for the Hurd, it sounded so obviously right fifteen years ago, but that was only because the older way had benefits we hadn't known about.     I think many of you who use the command line as much as I do know that we can just be thinking about what results we want and our fingers will start typing the commands needed. I assume it's some sort of parallel processing going on with the linguistic part of the brain. Unfortunately, that parallelism doesn't seem to work (at least for me) with searching the history. I realize I can save myself typing using the history shortly after my fingers have already started "speaking". But, when I hit ^R in Bash, everything I've already typed gets ignored and I have to stop and think again about what I was doing. It's a small bump in the road but it can be annoying, especially for long-time command line users. Usually M-p is exactly what I need to save myself time and trouble.     If you use the command line a lot, please give Meta-p a try. You may be surprised how it frees your brain to process more smoothly in parallel. (Or maybe it won't. Post here and let me know either way. ☺)

Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials

Print a great grey scale demo !
Seen here: http://www.pixelbeat.org/docs/terminal_colours/

Rename files in batch

Install pip with Proxy
Installs pip packages defining a proxy

Undo commit in Mercurial

Watch a movie in linux without the X windows system.


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