Commands using size (8)

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To print a specific line from a file
You can get one specific line during any procedure. Very interesting to be used when you know what line you want.

check open ports without netstat or lsof

Show top 50 running processes ordered by highest memory/cpu usage refreshing every 1s
http://alvinalexander.com/linux/unix-linux-process-memory-sort-ps-command-cpu for an overview of --sort available values

Move all images in a directory into a directory hierarchy based on year, month and day based on exif information
This command would move the file "dir/image.jpg" with a "DateTimeOriginal" of "2005:10:12 16:05:56" to "2005/10/12/image.jpg". This is a literal example from the exiftool man page, very useful for classifying photo's. The possibilities are endless.

Remove lines that contain a specific pattern($1) from file($2).
The -i option in sed allows in-place editing of the input file. Replace myexpression with any regular expression. /expr/d syntax means if the expression matches then delete the line. You can reverse the functionality to keep matching lines only by using: $ sed -i -n '/myexpression/p' /path/to/file.txt

Show complete URL in netstat output
This takes all of the tab spaces, and uses column to put them into the appropriately sized table.

capture mysql queries sent to server

Encrypted archive with openssl and tar
Create an AES256 encrypted and compressed tar archive. User is prompted to enter the password. Decrypt with: $ openssl enc -d -aes256 -in | tar --extract --file - --gzip

shell bash iterate number range with for loop

Downsample mp3s to 128K
This will lower the quality of mp3 files, but is necessary to play them on some mobile devices.


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