Commands using sleep (289)

  • #Usage: watch timeinsecond "command" Show Sample Output


    4
    watch() { while test :; do clear; date=$(date); echo -e "Every "$1"s: $2 \t\t\t\t $date"; $2; sleep $1; done }
    peshay · 2009-08-19 15:29:00 3
  • This is a more accurate way to watch the progress of a dd process. The $DDPID=$! is needed so that you don't get the PID of the sleep. The sleep 1 is needed because in my testing at least, if you run kill -USR1 against dd too quickly, it will kill it off instead of display the status. So you need to wait a second, probably so that it can configure itself to trap the USR1 signal. Show Sample Output


    4
    dd if=fromfile of=tofile & DDPID=$! ; sleep 1 ; while kill -USR1 $DDPID ; do sleep 5; done
    deltaray · 2010-01-12 15:01:44 4
  • Will track your mouse and save it to a file. You can use gnuplot to graph it: gnuplot -persist <(echo "unset key;unset border;unset yzeroaxis;unset xtics;unset ytics;unset ztics;plot './mouse-tracking' with points lt 1 pt 6 ps variable")


    4
    while true; do xdotool getmouselocation | sed 's/x:\(.*\) y:\(.*\) screen:.*/\1, \2/' >> ./mouse-tracking; sleep 10; done
    matthewbauer · 2010-02-27 04:00:13 5
  • Need to have rc iso pre-downloaded before running command.


    4
    mv ubuntu-10.04-rc-desktop-amd64.iso ubuntu-10.04-desktop-amd64.iso; i=http://releases.ubuntu.com/10.04/ubuntu-10.04-desktop-amd64.iso.zsync; while true; do if wget $i; then zsync $i; date; break; else sleep 30; fi; done
    stinkerweed999 · 2010-04-29 15:49:43 3
  • I like much more the perl solution, but without using perl. It launches a backgroup process that will kill the command if it lasts too much. A bigger function: check_with_timeout() { [ "$DEBUG" ] && set -x COMMAND=$1 TIMEOUT=$2 RET=0 # Launch command in backgroup [ ! "$DEBUG" ] && exec 6>&2 # Link file descriptor #6 with stderr. [ ! "$DEBUG" ] && exec 2> /dev/null # Send stderr to null (avoid the Terminated messages) $COMMAND 2>&1 >/dev/null & COMMAND_PID=$! [ "$DEBUG" ] && echo "Background command pid $COMMAND_PID, parent pid $$" # Timer that will kill the command if timesout sleep $TIMEOUT && ps -p $COMMAND_PID -o pid,ppid |grep $$ | awk '{print $1}' | xargs kill & KILLER_PID=$! [ "$DEBUG" ] && echo "Killer command pid $KILLER_PID, parent pid $$" wait $COMMAND_PID RET=$? # Kill the killer timer [ "$DEBUG" ] && ps -e -o pid,ppid |grep $KILLER_PID | awk '{print $1}' | xargs echo "Killing processes: " ps -e -o pid,ppid |grep -v PID | grep $KILLER_PID | awk '{print $1}' | xargs kill wait sleep 1 [ ! "$DEBUG" ] && exec 2>&6 6>&- # Restore stderr and close file descriptor #6. return $RET }


    4
    $COMMAND 2>&1 >/dev/null & WPID=$!; sleep $TIMEOUT && kill $! & KPID=$!; wait $WPID
    keymon · 2010-05-26 11:12:26 3
  • [ 2000 -ge "$(free -m | awk '/buffers.cache:/ {print $4}')" ] returns true if less than 2000 MB of RAM are available, so adjust this number to your needs. [ $(echo "$(uptime | awk '{print $10}' | sed -e 's/,$//' -e 's/,/./') >= $(grep -c ^processor /proc/cpuinfo)" | bc) -eq 1 ] returns true if the current machine load is at least equal to the number of CPUs. If either of the tests returns true we wait 10 seconds and check again. If both tests return false, i.e. 2GB are available and machine load falls below number of CPUs, we start our command and save it's output in a text file. The ( ( ... ) & ) construct lets the command run in background even if we log out. See http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/3115/ .


    4
    ( ( while [ 2000 -ge "$(free -m | awk '/buffers.cache:/ {print $4}')" ] || [ $(echo "$(uptime | awk '{print $10}' | sed -e 's/,$//' -e 's/,/./') >= $(grep -c ^processor /proc/cpuinfo)" | bc) -eq 1 ]; do sleep 10; done; my-command > output.txt ) & )
    michelsberg · 2010-07-13 09:12:11 3

  • 4
    while true; do lynx --dump http://whatthecommit.com/ | head -n 1 | cowsay; sleep 2; done
    linuxswords · 2011-01-27 14:36:12 9
  • Turn your terminal into digital clock. Show Sample Output


    4
    while [[ 1 ]] ; do clear; banner `date +%H:%M:%S` ; sleep 1; done
    lkj · 2011-03-24 16:41:09 5
  • Gives not only date but also some interesting status about the System Show Sample Output


    4
    while true; do tput sc; tput cup 0 $(($(tput cols)-74)); w | grep load; tput rc; sleep 10; done &
    ahofmann · 2011-04-27 09:28:27 4
  • This takes a webcam picture every everytime the mouse is moved (waits 10 seconds between checking for movement) and stores the picture wherever you want it. Ideas: Use in conjunction with a dropbox type application to see who is using your computer Use /dev/input/mice if /dev/input/mouse* doesn't work Use the bones of this to make a simple screensaver


    4
    while true; do sudo cat /dev/input/mouse0|read -n1;streamer -q -o /tmp/cam.jpeg -s 640x480 > /dev/null 2>&1; sleep 10;done
    SQUIIDUX · 2012-04-22 01:51:30 4
  • pvl 'link1' 'link2' 'link3' Play Youtube, Vimeo, etc links without visual elements. Great for music videos when you just want the audio. You can control mplayer with this! Hit Ctrl-C twice to exit (if you're playing multiple files)


    4
    pvl() { (for i in "$@"; do youtube-dl -q --max-downloads 1 --no-playlist "$i" -o - | mplayer -vo null /dev/fd/3 3<&0 </dev/tty; sleep .5; done); }
    snipertyler · 2015-07-14 04:44:36 26
  • See man vmstat for information about the statistics. This does the same thing without the timestamp: vmstat 5 Show Sample Output


    3
    while [ 1 ]; do echo -n "`date +%F_%T`" ; vmstat 1 2 | tail -1 ; sleep 4; done
    plasticboy · 2009-03-26 19:16:55 14
  • Chronic Bash function: chronic 3600 time # Print the time in your shell every hour chronic 60 updatedb > /dev/null # update slocate every minute Note: use 'jobs' to list background tasks and fg/bg to take control of them.


    3
    chronic () { t=$1; shift; while true; do $@; sleep $t; done & }
    rhythmx · 2009-06-13 05:57:54 16
  • Uses logger in a while loop to log memory statistics frequently into the local syslog server.


    3
    while true; do { $(which logger) -p local4.notice `free -m | grep Mem`; sleep 60; } done &
    Neo23x0 · 2009-06-22 00:29:53 7
  • Sleep 5h and plays the song as a wake up alarm


    3
    sleep 5h && rhythmbox path/to/song
    becomingGuru · 2009-06-25 19:15:19 12

  • 3
    watch() { t=$1; shift; while test :; do clear; date=$(date); echo -e "Every "$t"s: $@ \t\t\t\t $date"; $@; sleep $t; done }
    yaccovs · 2009-08-19 19:55:55 3
  • The following command will clone usb stick inside /dev/sdc to /dev/sdd Double check you got the correct usb sticks (origional-clone)with fdisk -l.


    3
    dd if=/dev/sdc of=/dev/sdd conv=notrunc & while killall -USR1 dd; do sleep 5; done
    bw · 2010-01-12 14:09:40 134
  • This ran on a ubuntu box using espeak for speaking text with the bash shell. On a mac you should use 'say'. Also you can change your alarm interval and your snooze interval which are currently 8 hours and 1 minute. I would run this via cron yet it's easier to disable if you run it as a command like this :P Show Sample Output


    3
    sleep 8h && while [ 1 ] ; do date "+Good Morning. It is time to wake up. The time is %I %M %p" | espeak -v english -p 0 -s 150 -a 100 ; sleep 1m; done
    copremesis · 2010-06-23 17:34:54 3
  • when using Gnome or KDE, you will have a hard time getting a screenshot of something like a login screen, or any other screen that occurs before the desktop environment is up and monitoring the printscreen key. (this probably applies for other DEs as well, but I haven't used them) What this command is meant to do is take a screenshot of an X window using a command you can run from your virtual terminals (actual text terminals, not just an emulator) To do this: Press CTRL+ALT+F1 to go to a virtual (text) terminal once your login window comes up Login to the virtual terminal and enter the command (you'll have to type it in) You should now have a file called screenshot.png in your home directory with your screenshot in it. For those of you who are new to the virtual terminal thing, you can use CTRL+ALT+F7 to get back to your regular GUI From http://www.gnome.org


    3
    chvt 7 ; sleep 2 ; DISPLAY=:0.0 import -window root screenshot.png
    camocrazed · 2010-08-20 17:28:49 12
  • In general, this is actually not better than the "scrot -d4" command I'm listing it as an alternative to, so please don't vote it down for that. I'm adding this command because xwd (X window dumper) comes with X11, so it is already installed on your machine, whereas scrot probably is not. I've found xwd handy on boxen that I don't want to (or am not allowed to) install packages on. NOTE: The dd junk for renaming the file is completely optional. I just did that for fun and because it's interesting that xwd embeds the window title in its metadata. I probably should have just parsed the output from file(1) instead of cutting it out with dd(1), but this was more fun and less error prone. NOTE2: Many programs don't know what to do with an xwd format image file. You can convert it to something normal using NetPBM's xwdtopnm(1) or ImageMagick's convert(1). For example, this would work: "xwd | convert fd:0 foo.jpg". Of course, if you have ImageMagick already installed, you'd probably use import(1) instead of xwd. NOTE3: Xwd files can be viewed using the X Window UnDumper: "xwud <foo.xwd". ImageMagick and The GIMP can also read .xwd files. Strangely, eog(1) cannot. NOTE4: The sleep is not strictly necessary, I put it in there so that one has time to raise the window above any others before clicking on it. Show Sample Output


    3
    sleep 4; xwd >foo.xwd; mv foo.xwd "$(dd skip=100 if=foo.xwd bs=1 count=256 2>/dev/null | egrep -ao '^[[:print:]]+' | tr / :).xwd"
    hackerb9 · 2010-09-19 08:03:02 3
  • enable each bash completion that you have installed at your system, that's very nice ;)


    3
    for x in $(eselect bashcomp list | sed -e 's/ //g' | cut -d']' -f2 | sed -e 's/\*//');do eselect bashcomp enable $x --global;sleep 0.5s;done
    chronos · 2010-09-21 00:17:26 5
  • using seq inside a subshell instead of a bash sequence to create increments. Show Sample Output


    3
    for i in $(seq 0 5 100); do echo $i; sleep 1; done | dialog --gauge "Install..." 6 40
    zed · 2010-10-08 04:08:17 3
  • Create a progress dialog with custom title and text using zenity. Show Sample Output


    3
    for i in $(seq 0 5 100); do echo $i; sleep 1; done | zenity --progress --title "Installing Foobar" --text "Pleae wait until process has finished."
    zed · 2010-10-08 04:08:33 2
  • Adjust "sleep X" to your needs. *NOTE: First sleep is required because bash doesn't have a "post-test" syntax (do XXX while). Show Sample Output


    3
    dd if=/path/to/inputfile of=/path/to/outputfile & pid=$! && sleep X && while kill -USR1 $pid; do sleep X; done
    cyrusza · 2010-12-02 15:07:18 7
  • There is no need for variables. I also added sleep to reduce cpu usage, however I didn't test it.


    3
    while :; do acpi -t | osd_cat -p bottom ; sleep 1; done &
    John_W · 2011-01-14 13:57:45 9
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Salvage a borked terminal
This works in some situations where 'reset' and the other alternatives don't.

monitor memory usage

Grep recursively for a pattern and open all files that match, in order, in Vim, landing on 1st match

Move all comments the top of the file in vim
Python comments begin with a #. Modify to suit other languages. Other uses: Instead of m0 use m$ for end of file or d for deleting all comments.

Get the full path of a bash script's Git repository head.
Rather than complicated and fragile paths relative to a script like "../../other", this command will retrieve the full path of the file's repository head. Safe with spaces in directory names. Works within a symlinked directory. Broken down: $cd "$(dirname "${BASH_SOURCE[0]}")" temporarily changes directories within this expansion. Double quoted "$(dirname" and ")" with unquoted ${BASH_SOURCE[0]} allows spaces in the path. $git rev-parse --show-toplevel gets the full path of the repository head of the current working directory, which was temporarily changed by the "cd".

cp the file
Copy the file with the given .extension at the source file's location. Eliminates the typing of long paths again and again.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

retab in vim, tab to space or space to tab, useful in python
usage: :[rang]ret[!][tabstop value] python is indent sensitive, after command :set list you may see your codes are mixed with tab and space ret can help you to convert space to tab or tab to space

Stop Flash from tracking everything you do.
Brute force way to block all LSO cookies on a Linux system with the non-free Flash browser plugin. Works just fine for my needs. Enjoy.

Watch RX/TX rate of an interface in kb/s
Just a simple way without the need of additional tools. Of course, replace eth0 with your IF.


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