Commands using slocate (1)

  • After you install slocate ,the first thing you have to do with it to initialise the database by issuing a command " slocate -u" . And then onwards just give the filename or dirname as a argument to the slocate command will reveal the files/dirs location in the system along with path.Moreover over it's an securely way of looking into the file system. Show Sample Output


    -3
    slocate filename/dirname
    unixbhaskar · 2009-08-29 03:28:08 0

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