Commands using sort (792)

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Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

ThePirateBay.org torrent search
usage: tpb searchterm example: tpb the matrix trilogy This searches for torrents from thepiratebay and displays the top results in reverse order, so the 1st result is at the bottom instead of the top -- which is better for command line users

gpg encrypt a file
gpg command to encrypt a file on the command line.

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

Copy the full path of a file to the clipboard (requires xclip or similar)
Handy for those times you need to paste a file path in an IDE or some other app. sudo apt-get install xclip Then, for convenience, alias xclip to 'xclip -selection c' so you can just do something like realpath . | xclip

show where symlinks are pointing
displays the output of ls -l without the rest of the crud. pretty simple but useful.

Grab all .flv files from a webpage to the current working directory
I wanted all the 'hidden' .flv files from the http link in the command line; wget seemed appropriate, fed with output from lynx, grep the flv files and the normalised via sed (to remove the numeric bullet). Similar to the 'Grab mp3 files' fu. Replace link with your own, grep arg with something more interesting ;) See here for something along the same lines... http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/1006/grab-mp3-files-from-your-favorite-netcasts-mp3blog-or-sites-that-often-have-good-mp3s Hope you find it useful! Improvements welcome, naturally.

PRINT LINE the width of screen or specified using any char including Colors, Escapes and metachars
One of the first functions programmers learn is how to print a line. This is my 100% bash builtin function to do it, which makes it as optimal as a function can be. The COLUMNS environment variable is also set by bash (including bash resetting its value when you resize your term) so its very efficient. I like pretty-output in my shells and have experimented with several ways to output a line the width of the screen using a minimal amount of code. This is like version 9,000 lol. This function is what I use, though when using colors or other terminal features I create separate functions that call this one, since this is the lowest level type of function. It might be better named printl(), but since I use it so much it's more optimal to have the name contain less chars (both for my programming and for the internal workings). If you do use terminal escapes this will reset to default. $ tput sgr0 For implementation ideas, check my http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html

Grep colorized
Highlights the search pattern in red.

Every Nth line position # (SED)
sed extract every nth line. Generic is: $ sed -n 'STARTPOSITION,${p;n;*LINE}' foo where n;*LINE = how many lines. thus p;n;n; is "for every 3 lines" and p;n;n;n;n; is "for every 5 lines"


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