Commands using ssh-keygen (31)

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Function to split a string into an array
It works as a method applicated to a variable, converts the string variable into an array

Set laptop display brightness
Run as root. Path may vary depending on laptop model and video card (this was tested on an Acer laptop with ATI HD3200 video). $ cat /proc/acpi/video/VGA/LCD/brightness to discover the possible values for your display.

a function to put environment variable in zsh history for editing
This only makes sense if you are using command line editing. Create the function in your current zsh session, then type eve PATH go 'UP' in your history and notice the current (editable) definition of PATH shows up as the previous command. Same as doing: PATH="'$PATH'" but takes fewer characters and you don't have to remember the escaping.

display systemd log entries for sshd using "no-pager" (a bit like in pre-systemd: grep sshd /var/log/messages)
In pre-systemd systems, something like: "# grep sshd /var/log/messages" would display log events in /var/log/messages containing "sshd". # journalctl -u sshd --no-pager The above command displays similar results for systemd systems. (Note that this needs to be run with root permissions to access the log data.)

Remove all HTML tags from a file
A shorter version of command #3014, using awk instead of sed. Useful when scraping websites with a script.

Print a great grey scale demo !
Seen here: http://www.pixelbeat.org/docs/terminal_colours/

Reboot without being root
For more, See: https://github.com/noureddin/bash-scripts/blob/master/user_scripts/userpower

get ip of all running docker containers
pretty self explanitory

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Find if $b is in $a in bash
Find if $b is in $a in bash


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