Commands using stat (65)

  • Nicely display permissions in octal format and filename for a given directory Show Sample Output


    25
    stat -c '%A %a %n' *
    servermanaged · 2009-04-09 10:44:56 3
  • This is useful if you'd like to see the output of a script while you edit it. Each time you save the file the command is executed. I thought for sure something like this already exists - and it probably does. I'm on an older system and tend to be missing some useful things. Examples: ontouchdo yourscript 'clear; yourscript somefiletoparse' Edit yourscript in a separate window and see new results each time you save. ontouchdo crufty.html 'clear; xmllint --noout crufty.html 2>&1 | head' Keep editing krufty.html until the xmllint window is empty. Note: Mac/bsd users should use stat -f%m. If you don't have stat, you can use perl -e '$f=shift; @s=stat($f); print "$s[9]\n";' $1


    9
    ontouchdo(){ while :; do a=$(stat -c%Y "$1"); [ "$b" != "$a" ] && b="$a" && sh -c "$2"; sleep 1; done }
    putnamhill · 2010-10-22 23:25:12 3
  • Imagine you've started a long-running process that involves piping data, but you forgot to add the progress-bar option to a command. e.g. xz -dc bigdata.xz | complicated-processing-program > summary . This command uses lsof to see how much data xz has read from the file. lsof -o0 -o -Fo FILENAME Display offsets (-o), in decimal (-o0), in parseable form (-Fo) This will output something like: . p12607 f3 o0t45187072 . Process id (p), File Descriptor (f), Offset (o) . We stat the file to get its size stat -c %s FILENAME . Then we plug the values into awk. Split the line at the letter t: -Ft Define a variable for the file's size: -s=$(stat...) Only work on the offset line: /^o/ . Note this command was tested using the Linux version of lsof. Because it uses lsof's batch option (-F) it may be portable. . Thanks to @unhammer for the brilliant idea. Show Sample Output


    7
    F=bigdata.xz; lsof -o0 -o -Fo $F | awk -Ft -v s=$(stat -c %s $F) '/^o/{printf("%d%%\n", 100*$2/s)}'
    flatcap · 2015-09-19 22:22:43 1
  • This is just a proof of concept: A FILE WHICH CAN AUTOMOUNT ITSELF through a SIMPLY ENCODED script. It takes advantage of the OFFSET option of mount, and uses it as a password (see that 9191? just change it to something similar, around 9k). It works fine, mounts, gets modified, updated, and can be moved by just copying it. USAGE: SEE SAMPLE OUTPUT The file is composed of three parts: a) The legible script (about 242 bytes) b) A random text fill to reach the OFFSET size (equals PASSWORD minus 242) c) The actual filesystem Logically, (a)+(b) = PASSWORD, that means OFFSET, and mount uses that option. PLEASE NOTE: THIS IS NOT AN ENCRYPTED FILESYSTEM. To improve it, it can be mounted with a better encryption script and used with encfs or cryptfs. The idea was just to test the concept... with one line :) It applies the original idea of http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/7382/command-for-john-cons for encrypting the file. The embedded bash script can be grown, of course, and the offset recalculation goes fine. I have my own version with bash --init-file to startup a bashrc with a well-defined environment, aliases, variables. Show Sample Output


    6
    dd if=/dev/zero of=T bs=1024 count=10240;mkfs.ext3 -q T;E=$(echo 'read O;mount -o loop,offset=$O F /mnt;'|base64|tr -d '\n');echo "E=\$(echo $E|base64 -d);eval \$E;exit;">F;cat <(dd if=/dev/zero bs=$(echo 9191-$(stat -c%s F)|bc) count=1) <(cat T;rm T)>>F
    rodolfoap · 2013-01-31 01:38:30 5
  • (Please see sample output for usage) script.bash is your script, which will be crypted to script.secure script.bash --> script.secure You can execute script.secure only if you know the password. If you die, your script dies with you. If you modify the startup line, be careful with the offset calculation of the crypted block (the XX string). Not difficult to make script editable (an offset-dd piped to a gpg -d piped to a vim - piped to a gpg -c directed to script.new ), but not enough space to do it on a one liner. Show Sample Output


    5
    echo "eval \"\$(dd if=\$0 bs=1 skip=XX 2>/dev/null|gpg -d 2>/dev/null)\"; exit" > script.secure; sed -i s:XX:$(stat -c%s script.secure): script.secure; gpg -c < script.bash >> script.secure; chmod +x script.secure
    rodolfoap · 2013-03-09 11:16:48 6
  • Goes through all files in the directory specified, uses `stat` to print out last modification time, then sorts numerically in reverse, then uses cut to remove the modified epoch timestamp and finally head to only output the last 10 modified files. Note that on a Mac `stat` won't work like this, you'll need to use either: find . -type f -print0 | xargs -0 stat -f '%m%t%Sm %12z %N' | sort -nr | cut -f2- | head or alternatively do a `brew install coreutils` and then replace `stat` with `gstat` in the original command. Show Sample Output


    5
    find . -type f -print0 | xargs -0 stat -c'%Y :%y %12s %n' | sort -nr | cut -d: -f2- | head
    HerbCSO · 2013-08-03 09:53:46 2
  • It's common to want to split up large files and the usual method is to use split(1). If you have a 10GiB file, you'll need 10GiB of free space. Then the OS has to read 10GiB and write 10GiB (usually on the same filesystem). This takes AGES. . The command uses a set of loop block devices to create fake chunks, but without making any changes to the file. This means the file splitting is nearly instantaneous. The example creates a 1GiB file, then splits it into 16 x 64MiB chunks (/dev/loop0 .. loop15). . Note: This isn't a drop-in replacement for using split. The results are block devices. tar and zip won't do what you expect when given block devices. . These commands will work: hexdump /dev/loop4 . gzip -9 < /dev/loop6 > part6.gz . cat /dev/loop10 > /media/usb/part10.bin Show Sample Output


    5
    FILE=file_name; CHUNK=$((64*1024*1024)); SIZE=$(stat -c "%s" $FILE); for ((i=0; i < $SIZE; i+=$CHUNK)); do losetup --find --show --offset=$i --sizelimit=$CHUNK $FILE; done
    flatcap · 2014-10-03 13:18:19 2
  • FILENAME=nohup.out mv -iv $FILENAME{,.$(stat -c %Y $FILENAME)} does it help ? Show Sample Output


    5
    mv -iv $FILENAME{,.$(stat -c %Z $FILENAME)}
    bunam · 2014-12-02 13:47:52 2

  • 4
    svn ci `svn stat |awk '/^A/{printf $2" "}'`
    realist · 2009-11-04 03:30:07 0
  • Note that the -i will not help in a script. Proper error checking is required. Show Sample Output


    4
    mv -iv $FILENAME{,.$(stat -c %y $FILENAME | awk '{print $1}')}
    pdxdoughnut · 2014-12-01 22:41:38 2
  • I use this to generate a playlist with all the podcasts I listen to. Ordered from most recent to older. Show Sample Output


    3
    find . -type f -print0 | xargs -r0 stat -c %Y\ %n | sort -rn | gawk '{sub(/.\//,"",$2); print $2}' > /tmp/playlist.m3u
    microft · 2009-03-04 16:41:02 3
  • This is an alternative to #9131. ffmpeg didn't work on my .au files, though it did on the .wav ones. Also useful if you don't have ffmpeg but do have sox. Handily, sox already reports in seconds (decimal). Show Sample Output


    3
    get_duration() { durline=$(sox "$1" -n stat 2>&1|grep "Length (seconds):");echo ${durline#*\: }; }
    splante · 2011-09-02 15:22:43 1
  • #Alias alias perm="stat -c '%n %U:%G-%a'" #Function perm() { for ll in $@; do stat -c "%n %U:%G-%a" "$ll"; done; } Show Sample Output


    3
    stat -c '%n %U:%G-%a' *
    snipertyler · 2014-05-03 04:56:23 0
  • This loop will finish if a file hasn't changed in the last 10 seconds. . It checks the file's modification timestamp against the clock. If 10 seconds have elapsed without any change to the file, then the loop ends. . This script will give a false positive if there's a 10 second delay between updates, e.g. due to network congestion . How does it work? 'date +%s' gives the current time in seconds 'stat -c %Y' gives the file's last modification time in seconds '$(( ))' is bash's way of doing maths '[ X -lt 10 ]' tests the result is Less Than 10 otherwise sleep for 1 second and repeat . Note: Clever as this script is, inotify is smarter. Show Sample Output


    3
    while [ $(( $(date +%s) - $(stat -c %Y FILENAME) )) -lt 10 ]; do sleep 1; done; echo DONE
    flatcap · 2015-05-09 12:30:13 0
  • When I go to change a configuration file I always like to make a backup first. You can use "cp -p" to preserve the modification time, but it gets confusing to have file.prev, file.prev2, etc. So I like to add a YYMMDD suffix that shows when the file was last changed. "stat -c %Y" gives you the modification time in epoch seconds, then "date -d @" converts that to whatever format you specify in your "+format" string. Show Sample Output


    3
    cp file file.$(date -d @$(stat -c '%Y' file) "+%y%m%d")
    dmmst19 · 2019-07-18 18:09:09 2
  • Since the original command (#1873) didn't work on FreeBSD whose stat lacks the "-c" switch, I wrote an alternative that does. This command shows also the fourth digit of octal format permissions which yields the sticky bit information. Show Sample Output


    2
    stat -f '%Sp %p %N' * | rev | sed -E 's/^([^[:space:]]+)[[:space:]]([[:digit:]]{4})[^[:space:]]*[[:space:]]([^[:space:]]+)/\1 \2 \3/' | rev
    vwal · 2009-08-04 08:45:20 0
  • Works with files containing spaces and for very large directories.


    2
    find -type f -print0 | xargs -r0 stat -c %y\ %n | sort
    dooblem · 2010-05-29 13:40:18 2
  • It find out the mic recording level at the moment of run the command and if a noise level is higher it starts to record an mp3 file. The resulting file will have only the sounds not the silences.


    2
    arecord -q -f cd -d 1 recvol.wav;sox recvol.wav -n stat 2>&1|grep RMS|grep amplitude|cut -d"." -f2|cut -c 1-2>recvol;echo $((`cat recvol`+1))>recvol;rec -t wav - silence 1 0.1 `cat recvol` -1 1.0 `cat recvol`%|lame -s 44.1 -a -v - >record.mp3
    geaplanet · 2014-02-27 23:23:55 0
  • Use color escape sequences and sed to colorize the output of svn stat -u. Colors: http://www.faqs.org/docs/abs/HTML/colorizing.html svn stat characters: http://svnbook.red-bean.com/en/1.4/svn-book.html#svn.ref.svn.c.status GNU Extensions for Escapes in Regular Expressions: http://www.gnu.org/software/sed/manual/html_node/Escapes.html


    1
    svn stat -u | sort | sed -e "s/^M.*/\o033[31m&\o033[0m/" -e "s/^A.*/\o033[34m&\o033[0m/" -e "s/^D.*/\o033[35m&\o033[0m/"
    friedchuckles · 2010-03-26 15:44:04 1
  • This will run stat on each file in the directory. Show Sample Output


    1
    find -name `egrep -s '.' * | awk -F":" '{print $1}' | sort -u` -exec stat {} \;
    unixmonkey8594 · 2010-04-26 20:01:44 2
  • This command remove a file from your filesystem like the normal rm command but instead of deleting only the inode information this also delete the data that was stored on blocks /!\ warning this may be long for large files Show Sample Output


    1
    function rrm(){ for i in $*; do; if [ -f $i ]; then; echo "rrm - Processing $i"; shred --force --remove --zero --verbose $i; else; echo "Can't process $i"; type=$(stat "$1" -c %F); echo "File $i is $type"; fi; done;}
    thelan · 2010-06-10 22:40:27 0
  • This script compares the modification date of /var/lib/dpkg/info/${package}.list and all the files mentioned there. It could be wrong on noatime partitions. Here is non-oneliner: #!/bin/sh package=$1; list=/var/lib/dpkg/info/${package}.list; inst=$(stat "$list" -c %X); cat $list | ( while read file; do if [ -f "$file" ]; then acc=$(stat "$file" -c %X); if [ $inst -lt $acc ]; then echo used $file exit 0 fi; fi; done exit 1 ) Show Sample Output


    1
    package=$1; list=/var/lib/dpkg/info/${package}.list; inst=$(stat "$list" -c %X); cat $list | (while read file; do if [ -f "$file" ];then acc=$(stat "$file" -c %X); if [ $inst -lt $acc ]; then echo used $file; exit 0; fi; fi; done; exit 1)
    pipeliner · 2010-09-20 18:10:19 0
  • Will automatically take the size of the file but longer, usefull only if in an function.


    1
    dd if=FILE | pv -s $(stat FILE | egrep -o "Size: [[:digit:]]*" | egrep -o "[[:digit:]]*") | dd of=OUTPUT
    andrepuel · 2011-02-09 22:21:06 1
  • This prints file access rights in octal - useful when "stat" is unavailable. Show Sample Output


    1
    perl -e 'printf "%04o\n", (stat shift)[2] & 0777;' file
    zlemini · 2012-03-22 15:05:04 3

  • 1
    svn stat | grep M | cut -d " " -f8 | xargs svn revert
    pranavkn · 2012-03-24 00:16:40 0
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list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Block all IP addresses and domains that have attempted brute force SSH login to computer
Searches all log files (including archived bzip2 files) for invalid user and PAM authentication errors, both of which are indicative of brute force attempts at logging into computer. A list of all unique IP addresses and domain names is appended to hosts.deny. The command (and grep error messages) will work on Mac OS X 10.6, small adjustments may be needed for other OSs.

Blue Matrix
Same as original, but works in bash

Multi-thread any command
For instance: $ find . -type f -name '*.wav' -print0 |xargs -0 -P 3 -n 1 flac -V8 will encode all .wav files into FLAC in parallel. Explanation of xargs flags: -P [max-procs]: Max number of invocations to run at once. Set to 0 to run all at once [potentially dangerous re: excessive RAM usage]. -n [max-args]: Max number of arguments from the list to send to each invocation. -0: Stdin is a null-terminated list. I use xargs to build parallel-processing frameworks into my scripts like the one here: http://pastebin.com/1GvcifYa

Exclude grep from your grepped output of ps (alias included in description)
Surround the first letter of what you are grepping with square brackets and you won't have to spawn a second instance of grep -v. You could also use an alias like this (albeit with sed): alias psgrep='ps aux | grep $(echo $1 | sed "s/^\(.\)/[\1]/g")'

Set Time Zone in Ubuntu
Reconfigures time zone in Ubuntu, which I cannot figure out how to do through the GUI. Worked like a charm to set my time zone to CEST from EDT.

Scan Subnet for IP and MAC addresses

a function to find the fastest DNS server
http://public-dns.info gives a list of online dns servers. you need to change the country in url (br in this url) with your country code. this command need some time to ping all IP in list.

Calculate days on which Friday the 13th occurs (inspired from the work of the user justsomeguy)
Friday is the 5th day of the week, monday is the 1st. Output may be affected by locale.


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