Commands using stat (59)

  • a quick function for searching changed files. just copy it in the bash Show Sample Output


    0
    FINDDATE() { LOCATION="${1:-.}"; find ${LOCATION} -type f -print0 | xargs -0 stat -c "%y %n" | sort | sed 's/.\([0-9]\)\{9,\} +0[1-2]00/\t/' | sed 's/ /\t/g' }
    emphazer · 2018-05-14 14:27:41 0
  • this is good for variables if you have many script created files and if you want to know which one is the last created/changed one..


    1
    find . -type f -print0 | xargs -0 stat -c '%y %n' | sort -n -k 1,1 -k 2,1 | awk 'END{print $NF}'
    emphazer · 2018-05-14 08:47:41 1
  • Benchmark a SQL query against MySQL Server. The example runs the query 10 times, and you get the average runtime in the output. To ensure that the query does not get cached, use `RESET QUERY CACHE;` on top in the query file. Show Sample Output


    1
    perf stat -r 10 sh -c "mysql > /dev/null < query.sql"
    particleflux · 2018-05-03 12:20:03 0
  • Based on capsule8 agent examples, not rigorously tested


    0
    perf stat -e exceptions:page_fault_user --filter "address > 0xffff000000000000"
    kodoque · 2018-01-17 19:16:10 0
  • Stat -c %n #list files. A find command is also useful Tee #use stdout, but reseend to next comand. Can be other Tee ad infinitum xargs #use de name of files to execute md5 and sha diggest.


    0
    stat -c %n * |tee >(xargs md5sum >estedir.md5) >(xargs sha512sum >estedir.sha)
    Wallebot · 2017-02-27 18:43:28 0
  • Muestra el crecimiento de un archivo por segundo. Cambia el texto "FILE" por el nombre del archivo a monitorear. Comando STAT


    -2
    while true; do A=$(stat -c%s FILE); sleep 1; B=$(stat -c%s FILE); echo -en "\r"$(($B-$A))" Bps"; done
    Zort · 2016-06-27 20:39:06 3

  • -2
    stat -f '%Su' /dev/console
    thealanberman · 2016-01-13 20:53:13 0

  • 0
    stat -c '%A %a %n' /path/to/file
    lolssl · 2015-09-22 16:54:13 0
  • Imagine you've started a long-running process that involves piping data, but you forgot to add the progress-bar option to a command. e.g. xz -dc bigdata.xz | complicated-processing-program > summary . This command uses lsof to see how much data xz has read from the file. lsof -o0 -o -Fo FILENAME Display offsets (-o), in decimal (-o0), in parseable form (-Fo) This will output something like: . p12607 f3 o0t45187072 . Process id (p), File Descriptor (f), Offset (o) . We stat the file to get its size stat -c %s FILENAME . Then we plug the values into awk. Split the line at the letter t: -Ft Define a variable for the file's size: -s=$(stat...) Only work on the offset line: /^o/ . Note this command was tested using the Linux version of lsof. Because it uses lsof's batch option (-F) it may be portable. . Thanks to @unhammer for the brilliant idea. Show Sample Output


    7
    F=bigdata.xz; lsof -o0 -o -Fo $F | awk -Ft -v s=$(stat -c %s $F) '/^o/{printf("%d%%\n", 100*$2/s)}'
    flatcap · 2015-09-19 22:22:43 1

  • 1
    stat -c'%s %n' **/* | sort -n
    ysangkok · 2015-08-25 18:23:55 0
  • I have this in my .bash_aliases and call it before running apt-get install or apt-get upgrade Example: alias apt-install='apt-update; apt-get install' alias apt-upgrade='apt-update; apt-get upgrade' function apt-update () { if [[ $(expr $(date +%s) - $(stat -c %X /var/lib/apt/periodic/update-success-stamp)) -gt 86400 ]]; then sudo apt-get update else echo apt is up to date fi }


    0
    if [[ $(expr $(date +%s) - $(stat -c %X /var/lib/apt/periodic/update-success-stamp)) -gt 86400 ]]; then sudo apt-get update fi
    gargolito · 2015-05-12 14:45:11 0
  • This loop will finish if a file hasn't changed in the last 10 seconds. . It checks the file's modification timestamp against the clock. If 10 seconds have elapsed without any change to the file, then the loop ends. . This script will give a false positive if there's a 10 second delay between updates, e.g. due to network congestion . How does it work? 'date +%s' gives the current time in seconds 'stat -c %Y' gives the file's last modification time in seconds '$(( ))' is bash's way of doing maths '[ X -lt 10 ]' tests the result is Less Than 10 otherwise sleep for 1 second and repeat . Note: Clever as this script is, inotify is smarter. Show Sample Output


    3
    while [ $(( $(date +%s) - $(stat -c %Y FILENAME) )) -lt 10 ]; do sleep 1; done; echo DONE
    flatcap · 2015-05-09 12:30:13 0
  • FILENAME=nohup.out mv -iv $FILENAME{,.$(stat -c %Y $FILENAME)} does it help ? Show Sample Output


    5
    mv -iv $FILENAME{,.$(stat -c %Z $FILENAME)}
    bunam · 2014-12-02 13:47:52 2
  • Note that the -i will not help in a script. Proper error checking is required. Show Sample Output


    3
    mv -iv $FILENAME{,.$(stat -c %y $FILENAME | awk '{print $1}')}
    pdxdoughnut · 2014-12-01 22:41:38 2
  • It's common to want to split up large files and the usual method is to use split(1). If you have a 10GiB file, you'll need 10GiB of free space. Then the OS has to read 10GiB and write 10GiB (usually on the same filesystem). This takes AGES. . The command uses a set of loop block devices to create fake chunks, but without making any changes to the file. This means the file splitting is nearly instantaneous. The example creates a 1GiB file, then splits it into 16 x 64MiB chunks (/dev/loop0 .. loop15). . Note: This isn't a drop-in replacement for using split. The results are block devices. tar and zip won't do what you expect when given block devices. . These commands will work: hexdump /dev/loop4 . gzip -9 < /dev/loop6 > part6.gz . cat /dev/loop10 > /media/usb/part10.bin Show Sample Output


    5
    FILE=file_name; CHUNK=$((64*1024*1024)); SIZE=$(stat -c "%s" $FILE); for ((i=0; i < $SIZE; i+=$CHUNK)); do losetup --find --show --offset=$i --sizelimit=$CHUNK $FILE; done
    flatcap · 2014-10-03 13:18:19 2
  • Caution: distructive overwrite of filenames Useful for concatenating pdfs in date order using pdftk


    0
    find . -name "*.pdf" -print0 | xargs -r0 stat -c %y\ %n | sort|awk '{print $4}'|gawk 'BEGIN{ a=1 }{ printf "mv %s %04d.pdf\n", $0, a++ }' | bash
    Randy_Legault · 2014-09-23 06:40:45 1
  • This function will find the modification time in unix_time of the given file, then calculate the number of minutes from now to then and then find all files modified in that range. Show Sample Output


    0
    function findOlderThan () { find . -mmin -$((($(date "+%s") - $(stat -c %Y $1))/60)) -type f ; }
    RobertDeRose · 2014-08-29 17:52:34 0

  • 1
    stat -f%Su /dev/console
    bupsy · 2014-07-25 01:53:59 0
  • #Alias alias perm="stat -c '%n %U:%G-%a'" #Function perm() { for ll in $@; do stat -c "%n %U:%G-%a" "$ll"; done; } Show Sample Output


    3
    stat -c '%n %U:%G-%a' *
    snipertyler · 2014-05-03 04:56:23 0
  • It find out the mic recording level at the moment of run the command and if a noise level is higher it starts to record an mp3 file. The resulting file will have only the sounds not the silences.


    2
    arecord -q -f cd -d 1 recvol.wav;sox recvol.wav -n stat 2>&1|grep RMS|grep amplitude|cut -d"." -f2|cut -c 1-2>recvol;echo $((`cat recvol`+1))>recvol;rec -t wav - silence 1 0.1 `cat recvol` -1 1.0 `cat recvol`%|lame -s 44.1 -a -v - >record.mp3
    geaplanet · 2014-02-27 23:23:55 0
  • Find files and calculate size with stat of result in shell


    1
    find . -name "pattern" -exec stat -c%s {} \; | awk '{total += $1} END {print total}'
    Koobiac · 2014-01-15 11:07:09 0
  • Goes through all files in the directory specified, uses `stat` to print out last modification time, then sorts numerically in reverse, then uses cut to remove the modified epoch timestamp and finally head to only output the last 10 modified files. Note that on a Mac `stat` won't work like this, you'll need to use either: find . -type f -print0 | xargs -0 stat -f '%m%t%Sm %12z %N' | sort -nr | cut -f2- | head or alternatively do a `brew install coreutils` and then replace `stat` with `gstat` in the original command. Show Sample Output


    5
    find . -type f -print0 | xargs -0 stat -c'%Y :%y %12s %n' | sort -nr | cut -d: -f2- | head
    HerbCSO · 2013-08-03 09:53:46 2

  • 0
    perl -e 'printf "%o\n", (stat shift)[2]&07777' file
    smallduck · 2013-06-15 19:26:23 0

  • 0
    stat -f -L -c %T YOUR_FILE_OR_DIRECTORY
    Koobiac · 2013-06-14 07:27:41 0
  • (Please see sample output for usage) script.bash is your script, which will be crypted to script.secure script.bash --> script.secure You can execute script.secure only if you know the password. If you die, your script dies with you. If you modify the startup line, be careful with the offset calculation of the crypted block (the XX string). Not difficult to make script editable (an offset-dd piped to a gpg -d piped to a vim - piped to a gpg -c directed to script.new ), but not enough space to do it on a one liner. Show Sample Output


    5
    echo "eval \"\$(dd if=\$0 bs=1 skip=XX 2>/dev/null|gpg -d 2>/dev/null)\"; exit" > script.secure; sed -i s:XX:$(stat -c%s script.secure): script.secure; gpg -c < script.bash >> script.secure; chmod +x script.secure
    rodolfoap · 2013-03-09 11:16:48 5
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