Commands using strings (23)

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Double your disk read performance in a single command
(WARN) This will absolutely not work on all systems, unless you're running large, high speed, hardware RAID arrays. For example, systems using Dell PERC 5/i SAS/SATA arrays. If you have a hardware RAID array, try it. It certainly wont hurt. You may be can test the speed disk with some large file in your system, before and after using this: $ time dd if=/tmp/disk.iso of=/dev/null bs=256k To know the value of block device parameter known as readahead. $ blockdev --getra /dev/sdb And set the a value 1024, 2048, 4096, 8192, and maybe 16384... it really depends on the number of hard disks, their speed, your RAID controller, etc. (see sample)

Project your desktop using xrandr
HDMI-1 is the interface in the example, which can be obtained just by typing xrandr and surfing through the output. There are a hell lot of configurations that can be done but I prefer auto because it works in most cases. $ Lifesaver

which process is accessing the CDROM

Watch YouTube and other Flash videos via mplayer (or whatever)
Many sites with Flash video players will download video files to /tmp on Linux, with temporary filenames like "FlashbGTHm4". These will often play in mplayer, totem, or other movie playing software. You must first navigate to a video page, let it start loading, and then pause playback.

useless load
check your load with top... Start more of these jobs to get an multi-core cpu busy...

Show log message including which files changed for a given commit in git.

view http traffic

Delete all files in a folder that don't match a certain file extension
Deletes all files in a folder that are NOT *.foo, *.bar or *.baz files. Edit the pattern inside the brackets as you like.

save date and time for each command in history
for the change stay in your history file , export command by writing it into your .bashrc

ssh autocomplete based on ~/.ssh/config
I use this in my bashrc to expand hosts defined in ~/.ssh/config: function _ssh_completion() { perl -ne 'print "$1 " if /^Host (.+)$/' ~/.ssh/config } complete -W "$(_ssh_completion)" ssh Here's a great article on how to setup your own ~/.ssh/config: http://blogs.perl.org/users/smylers/2011/08/ssh-productivity-tips.html


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