Commands using times (1)

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Search command history on bash
Very handy and time-saving. Do a 'ctrl+ r' on command prompt. You will see a "(reverse-i-search)`':" mark. Just type any sub-string of the command you want to search(provided you have used it sometime in the same session). Keep on searching by repeatedly pressing ctrl+r. Press enter once you get the desired command string.

Sets shell timeout
Useful in root's .profile - will auto-logout after TMOUT seconds of inactivity. Close after `seconds` inactive. export TMOUT=seconds (unefunge)

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

tail, with specific pattern colored

Find out my Linux distribution name and version

Generate a Change Log with git
Generate a changelog between the v1 and v2 tags

Search for an active process without catching the search-process
This does the same thing as many of the 'grep' based alternatives but allows a more finite control over the output. For example if you only wanted the process ID you could change the command: $ ps -ef | awk '/mingetty/ && !/awk/ {print $2}' If you wanted to kill the returned PID's: $ ps -ef | awk '/mingetty/ && !/awk/ {print $2}' | xargs -i kill {}

Get the IP of the host your coming from when logged in remotely
Even faster without the need for cut... :)

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Changing the terminal title to the last shell command
Found the same command for zsh in http://www.davidpashley.com/articles/xterm-titles-with-bash.html - changed it a bit so that the behaviour is the same


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