Commands using uniq (252)

  • This command might not be useful for most of us, I just wanted to share it to show power of command line. Download simple text version of novel David Copperfield from Poject Gutenberg and then generate a single column of words after which occurences of each word is counted by sort | uniq -c combination. This command removes numbers and single characters from count. I'm sure you can write a shorter version. Show Sample Output


    -4
    wget -q -O- http://www.gutenberg.org/dirs/etext96/cprfd10.txt | sed '1,419d' | tr "\n" " " | tr " " "\n" | perl -lpe 's/\W//g;$_=lc($_)' | grep "^[a-z]" | awk 'length > 1' | sort | uniq -c | awk '{print $2"\t"$1}'
    alperyilmaz · 2009-05-04 16:00:39 8
  • netstat has two lines of headers: Active Internet connections (w/o servers) Proto Recv-Q Send-Q Local Address Foreign Address State Added a filter in the awk command to remove them


    -4
    netstat -ntu | awk ' $5 ~ /^[0-9]/ {print $5}' | cut -d: -f1 | sort | uniq -c | sort -n
    letterj · 2011-07-04 20:23:21 1
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Find duplicate UID in /etc/passwd
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Merge files, joining each line in one line
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Mount directories in different locations
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remove repeated pairs of characters e.g. "xtxtxtxt" will become "xt"
This will remove repeated characters e.g. echo "xtxtxtxt" | sed -ru 's/(..)\1{2,}/\1/g' the output will just be "xt"

Show display adapter, available drivers, and driver in use


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