Commands using uudecode (1)

  • cat didn't seem to work with binaries to well for me, the above command seemed to do the trick. Opps should be pointed out its going through a "hop" box (which is why I was searching here in first place), only need the last bit (after the -t) if doing it directly from one box to another...


    0
    ssh username1@servername1 -t ssh username2@servername2 uuencode -m testfile1.tar - | uudecode > testfile1.tar
    djt78 · 2013-01-28 17:06:00 0

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