Commands using uuencode (13)

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Tail postfix current maillog and grep for "criteria"
Tail curren postfix maillog.

Get just the IP for a hostname

Replace multiple file extensions with a single extension
The above is just a prove of concept based around the nested bash substitution. This could be useful in situations where you're in a directory with many filetypes but you only want to convert a few. $ for f in *.bmp *.jpg *.tga; do convert $f ${f%.*}.png; done or you can use ls | egrep to get more specific... but be warned, files with spaces will cause a ruckus with expansion but the bash for loop uses a space delimited list. $ for f in $(ls | egrep "bmp$|jpg$|tga$"); do convert $f ${f%.*}.png; done I'm guessing some people will still prefer doing it the sed way but I thought the concept of this one was pretty neat. It will help me remember bash substitutions a little better :-P

send raw data (hex written)using UDP to an IP and port
Use it to send raw data to a networked device. Used to interact with relay controller board whose documentation is lost, so use wireshark to sniff the sent data and replayed using the command.

most changed files in domains by rdiff-backup output

Just run it ;)
;)

Convert all .flac from a folder subtree in 192Kb mp3
find . -type f -iname '*.flac' # searches from the current folder recursively for .flac audio files | # the output (a .flac audio files with relative path from ./ ) is piped to while read FILE; do FILENAME="${FILE%.*}"; flac -cd "$FILE" | lame -b 192 - "${FILENAME}.mp3"; done # for each line on the list: # FILE gets the file with .flac extension and relative path # FILENAME gets FILE without the .flac extension # run flac for that FILE with output piped to lame conversion to mp3 using 192Kb bitrate

Look up the definition of a word
A bash function might also be useful: $ dict() { curl dict://dict.org/d:$1; } Or if you want less verbose output: $ dict() { curl -s dict://dict.org/d:$1 | perl -ne 's/\r//; last if /^\.$/; print if /^151/../^250/'; }

command line Google I'm Feeling Lucky
opens the Google I'm Feeling Lucky result in lynx, the command line browser

Google URL shortener
use curl and sed to shorten an url via goo.gl


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