Commands using watch (154)

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Poor man's unsort (randomize lines)

Sort file greater than a specified size in human readeable format including their path and typed by color, running from current directory
1. find file greater than 10 MB 2. direct it to xargs 3. xargs pass them as argument to ls

Identify differences between directories (possibly on different servers)
This can be much faster than downloading one or both trees to a common servers and comparing the files there. After, only those files could be copied down for deeper comparison if needed.

check spell in c source code

Copy files to a remote host with SFTP with a leading dot, then rename them to the real file name
Usage: $ sftp-cp * | sftp [email protected]:/dir This is useful if there is a process on the remote machine waiting for files in an incoming directory. This way it won't see half-transmitted files if it ignores hidden files.

CLFUContest : Check which process consume more than 10% of the cpu (configurable)

Find a CommandlineFu users average command rating

find and remove old compressed backup files
remove all compressed files in /home/ folder not created in the last 10 days

Insert the last argument of the previous command
for example if you did a: $ ls -la /bin/ls then $ ls !$ is equivalent to doing a $ ls /bin/ls

Calculating series with awk: add numbers from 1 to 100
"seq 100" outputs 1,2,..,100, separated by newlines. awk adds them up and displays the sum. "seq 1 2 11" outputs 1,3,..,11. Variations: 1+3+...+(2n-1) = n^2 $ seq 1 2 19 | awk '{sum+=$1} END {print sum}' # displays 100 1/2 + 1/4 + ... = 1 $ seq 10 | awk '{sum+=1/(2**$1)} END {print sum}' # displays 0.999023


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