Commands using watch (155)

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Add an iptables rule on RH/CentOs before the reject
Rather then editing the /etc/sysconfig/iptables file, or during a kickstart doing some awk/sed magic, easily add a rule in the correct place within iptables

Tell local Debian machine to install packages used by remote Debian machine
(also works on Ubuntu) Copies the 'install,' 'hold,' 'deinstall' and 'purge' states of packages on the remote machine to be matched on the local machine. Note: if packages were installed on the local machine that were never installed on the remote machine, they will not be deinstalled by this operation.

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Random line from bash.org (funny IRC quotes)
bash.org is a collection of funny quotes from IRC. WARNING: some of the quotes contain "adult" jokes... may be embarrassing if your boss sees them... Thanks to Chen for the idea and initial version! This script downloads a page with random quotes, filters the html to retrieve just one liners quotes and outputs the first one. Just barely under the required 255 chars :) Improvment: You can replace the head -1 at the end by: $awk 'length($0)>0 {printf( $0 "\n%%\n" )}' > bash_quotes.txt which will separate the quotes with a "%" and place it in the file. and then: $strfile bash_quotes.txt which will make the file ready for the fortune command and then you can: $fortune bash_quotes.txt which will give you a random quote from those in the downloaded file. I download a file periodically and then use the fortune in .bashrc so I see a funny quote every time I open a terminal.

Summarise the size of all files matching a simple regex
Use the find command to match certain files and summarise their total size in KBytes.

follow the content of all files in a directory
The `-q' arg forces tail to not output the name of the current file

Colored SVN diff
Simple way to achieve a colored SVN diff

Ctrl+S Ctrl+Q terminal output lock and unlock
These are simple shortcuts to pause and continue terminal output, works in most terminals and screen multiplexers like screen. You can use it to catch something if things change too fast, and scroll with Shift + PgUp PgDown. On linux console ScrollLock can also be used.

Batch rename extension of all files in a folder, in the example from .txt to .md


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