Commands using watch (154)

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Compare a remote file with a local file
A little messy, but functional. Requires vim >= 7.x.

restoring some data from a corrupted text file
man tac When there is a bad block in the middle of your file, you can see its begninning with `cat' and its end with `tac'. But both commands terminates with an error. So this sequence rebuilds a new file without badblock.

Get the time from NIST.GOV
The format is JJJJJ YR-MO-DA HH:MM:SS TT L DUT1 msADV UTC(NIST) OTM and is explained more fully here: http://tf.nist.gov/service/acts.htm

get time in other timezones
On Ubuntu, if tzwatch is installed, then you can call up in terminal the output for every time zone configured in gWorldClock.

ls -hog --> a more compact ls -l
I often deal with long file names and the 'ls -l' command leaves very little room for file names. An alternative is to use the -h -o and -g flags (or together, -hog). * The -h flag produces human-readable file size (e.g. 91K instead of 92728) * The -o suppresses the owner column * The -g suppresses the group column Since I use to alias ll='ls -l', I now do alias ll='ls -hog'

Set an alarm to wake up
Sleep 5h and plays the song as a wake up alarm

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

list files recursively by size

JSON processing with Python
Validates and pretty-prints the content fetched from the URL.

phpdoc shortcut
A shortcut to generate documentation with phpdoc. Defaults to HTML; optionally to PDF if third argument is given. Stores documentation in cwd under ./docs/. I forget the syntax to the output, -o, option, so this is easier.


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