Commands using watch (154)

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Print every Nth line
Sometimes commands give you too much feedback. Perhaps 1/100th might be enough. If so, every() is for you. $ my_verbose_command | every 100 will print every 100th line of output. Specifically, it will print lines 100, 200, 300, etc If you use a negative argument it will print the *first* of a block, $ my_verbose_command | every -100 It will print lines 1, 101, 201, 301, etc The function wraps up this useful sed snippet: $ ... | sed -n '0~100p' don't print anything by default $ sed -n starting at line 0, then every hundred lines ( ~100 ) print. $ '0~100p' There's also some bash magic to test if the number is negative: we want character 0, length 1, of variable N. $ ${N:0:1} If it *is* negative, strip off the first character ${N:1} is character 1 onwards (second actual character).

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Programmatic way to find and set your timezone
1. it find your public ip via ifconfig.io 2. than use this IP to request your timezone via worldtimeapi.org 3. and send it to the command timedatectl set-timezone

Quick HTML image gallery from folder contents with Perl
This includes a title attribute so you can see the file name by hovering over an image. Also will hoover up any image format - jpg, gif and png.

Backup with versioning
Apart from an exact copy of your recent contents, also keep all earlier versions of files and folders that were modified or deleted. Inspired by the excellent EVACopy http://evacopy.sourceforge.net

Ultimate current directory usage command
Based on the MrMerry one, just add some visuals to differentiate files and directories

Check apache config syntax and restart or edit the file
Checks the apache configuration syntax, if is OK then restart the service otherwise opens the configuration file with VIM on the line where the configuration fails.

Get all these commands in a text file with description.
I tried out on my Mac, jot to generate sequence ( 0,25,50,..), you can use 'seq' if it is linux to generate numbers, need curl installed on the machine, then it rocks. @Satya

Dump HTTP header using wget
Let me suggest using wget for obtaining the HTTP header only as the last resort because it generates considerable textual overhead. The first ellipsis of the sample output stands for Spider mode enabled. Check if remote file exists. --2009-03-31 20:42:46-- http://www.example.com/ Resolving www.example.com... 208.77.188.166 Connecting to www.example.com|208.77.188.166|:80... connected. HTTP request sent, awaiting response... and the second one looks for Length: 438 [text/html] Remote file exists and could contain further links, but recursion is disabled -- not retrieving.

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.


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