kill an arbitrary process running on an Android device attached via USB debug cable

adb shell ps | grep <process name> | awk '{print $2}' | xargs adb shell kill
This is great when you need to reboot the system-server, or your own daemon that has gone crazy

0
2012-03-03 01:03:39

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  • Crude, but works. Note for security, /data/ will be inaccessible unless your device has been *rooted*. On the other hand, if a device has been rooted, its data is now wide open to anyone with a USB cable and the above "one-liner". `adb` is one of the platform tools in the android SDK. To get SMS messages: adb pull /data/data/com.android.providers.telephony/databases/mmssms.db ; sqlite3 -batch <<EOF contacts2.db <CR> .header on <CR> .mode tabs <CR> select * from sms; <CR> EOF


    2
    adb pull /data/data/com.android.providers.contacts/databases/contacts2.db ; sqlite3 -batch <<EOF contacts2.db <CR> .header on <CR> .mode tabs <CR> select * from data; <CR> EOF
    mhs · 2012-12-26 11:35:23 0
  • This command will open the AVD Manager in Mac OS X.


    0
    /usr/bin/java -Xmx256M -XstartOnFirstThread -Dcom.android.sdkmanager.toolsdir=android-sdk/tools -classpath android-sdk/tools/lib/sdkmanager.jar:android-sdk/tools/lib/swtmenubar.jar:android-sdk/tools/lib/x86_64/swt.jar com.android.sdkmanager.Main avd
    99RedBalloons · 2013-10-04 02:39:00 0
  • I like much more the perl solution, but without using perl. It launches a backgroup process that will kill the command if it lasts too much. A bigger function: check_with_timeout() { [ "$DEBUG" ] && set -x COMMAND=$1 TIMEOUT=$2 RET=0 # Launch command in backgroup [ ! "$DEBUG" ] && exec 6>&2 # Link file descriptor #6 with stderr. [ ! "$DEBUG" ] && exec 2> /dev/null # Send stderr to null (avoid the Terminated messages) $COMMAND 2>&1 >/dev/null & COMMAND_PID=$! [ "$DEBUG" ] && echo "Background command pid $COMMAND_PID, parent pid $$" # Timer that will kill the command if timesout sleep $TIMEOUT && ps -p $COMMAND_PID -o pid,ppid |grep $$ | awk '{print $1}' | xargs kill & KILLER_PID=$! [ "$DEBUG" ] && echo "Killer command pid $KILLER_PID, parent pid $$" wait $COMMAND_PID RET=$? # Kill the killer timer [ "$DEBUG" ] && ps -e -o pid,ppid |grep $KILLER_PID | awk '{print $1}' | xargs echo "Killing processes: " ps -e -o pid,ppid |grep -v PID | grep $KILLER_PID | awk '{print $1}' | xargs kill wait sleep 1 [ ! "$DEBUG" ] && exec 2>&6 6>&- # Restore stderr and close file descriptor #6. return $RET }


    4
    $COMMAND 2>&1 >/dev/null & WPID=$!; sleep $TIMEOUT && kill $! & KPID=$!; wait $WPID
    keymon · 2010-05-26 11:12:26 0
  • You cannot kill zombies, as they are already dead. But if you have too many zombies then kill parent process or restart service. You can kill zombie process using PID obtained from the above command. For example kill zombie proces having PID 4104: # kill -9 4104 Please note that kill -9 does not guarantee to kill a zombie process.


    -1
    kill -HUP `ps -A -ostat,ppid,pid,cmd | grep -e '^[Zz]' | awk '{print $2}'`
    liupeng · 2009-02-06 02:42:14 0

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