Swap the two last arguments of the current command line

<ctrl+e> <esc+t>
Say you just typed a long command like this: rsync -navupogz --delete /long/path/to/dir_a /very/long/path/to/dir_b but you really want to sync dir_b to dir_a. Instead of rewriting all the command line, just type followed by , and your command line will read rsync -navupogz --delete /very/long/path/to/dir_b /long/path/to/dir_a

13
By: bibe
2012-03-11 07:49:09

What Others Think

Nice. It's worth pointing out a few things. @bibe: I'd add "readline" to the description (make it easier to search for). Ctrl-E moves the cursor to the end of the line, but if you've just used up-arrow to alter the previous command the cursor will already *be* at the end. You can replace Esc-T with Meta-T (or Alt-T) -- easier to type on many keyboards. Unfortunately, readline seems to treat . (dot/period) as a separator: echo hello wor.ld becomes echo hello ld.wor Anyone know how to set the word break characters?
flatcap · 401 weeks ago
It does not appears to work in my Solaris 5.10 machine..!
michaelrozar17 · 399 weeks and 2 days ago
@michaelrozar17 on my Commodore64 doesn't work either!
ioggstream · 397 weeks and 5 days ago
Funny and useful keybinding but can't see how you could swap whole paths as in your example. - swaps *two* word (@flatcap swaps just *one* word AFAIK). - readline treats '/' as a word on my boxes (Arch and Debian).
datruche · 186 weeks ago
(sorry forgot cmdlinefu's code cleaner) Funny and useful keybinding but can't see how you could swap whole paths as in your example. - Esc-t swaps *two* word (@flatcap Alt-t swaps just *one* word AFAIK). - readline treats '/' as a word on my boxes (Arch and Debian).
datruche · 186 weeks ago

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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